Mollusca

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Mol·lus·ca

(mo-lŭs'kă),
A phylum of the subkingdom Metazoa with soft, unsegmented bodies, consisting of an anterior head, a dorsal visceral mass and a ventral foot. Most forms are enclosed in a protective calcareous shell. Mollusca includes the classes Gastropoda (snails, whelks, slugs), Pelecypoda (oysters, clams, mussels), Cephalopoda (squids, octopuses), Amphineura (chitons), Scaphopoda (tooth shells), and the class of primitive metameric mollusks, Monoplacophora.
[L. mollusca, a nut with a thin shell, fr. mollis, soft]

Mollusca

(mŏl-lŭs′kă)
A phylum of animals that includes the bivalves (mussels, oysters, clams), slugs, and snails. Snails are intermediate hosts for many parasitic flukes. Oysters, clams, and mussels, esp. if inadequately cooked, may transmit the hepatitis A virus or bacterial pathogens.
References in periodicals archive ?
E-1: Scientists who study mollusks are called malacologists.
American Malacological Union, 63rd Annual Meeting, and Western Society of Malacologists, 30th Annual Meeting, Program and abstracts, p.
Williamson amassed a significant collection of shells, corresponding extensively with malacologists from around the world.
One of South Africa's foremost malacologists, Richard Kilburn passed away somewhat suddenly on 26 July 2013 at the age of 71.
The Western Society of Malacologists Occasional Paper 1: 66 pp.
Malacologists, working in the southern Glacial Lake Agassiz region (e.g., Wilson and Danglade, 1914; Dawley, 1947; Cvancara and Cvancara et al., see below; Clarke, 1973, 1981) and elsewhere (e.g., Simpson, 1896; Ortmann, 1924; Johnson, 1970, 1980), recognized the effect of the latest Pleistocene (Wisconsin) deglaciation on the distribution of freshwater pearly mussels (Bivalvia: Unionoidea) in the Canadian Interior and Great Lakes basins.
(It is more appropriate to refer to this as "torsion," but malacologists use this term to describe the contortion of gastropod anatomy during early ontogeny).
All material of this species was originally in the collection of Adolfo Ortiz de Zarate Lopez, who exchanged Fernando Poo land snails with various professional and amateur malacologists. Only four specimens of A.
Such temporal recruitment patterns should not be surprising to malacologists with a working knowledge of bivalves with a life expectancy of l0-20 y, arguably typical in pristine oyster populations prior to human impacts on their habitats.
Microscopic gastropods of the marine interstitial environment have long fascinated malacologists and meiobenthologists alike, revealing a wealth of unusual species with unique biological adaptations distinct from other benthic molluscs (Swedmark, 1964, 1968).
Some of the first malacologists to describe the Tanganyikan gastropods placed them in marine gastropod families (Bourguignat 1890; Moore 1898, 1899, 1903).
In: Second annual meeting, Western Society of Malacologists. 10 pp.