majority language


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majority language

(mă-jor′ĭt-ē)
The language spoken by most of the people living in a multilingual nation.
References in periodicals archive ?
English is the majority language here and in many countries where it is not the national language.
They can communicate with parents and guardians who may not be able to communicate comfortably in the majority language or dialect.
The gathering in the UN was not a cultural show to present Urdu as Pakistan's majority language. Choosing Urdu for his speech was perhaps Mr Qureshi's obligation to please the audience at home but he missed an opportunity to present Pakistan's case effectively.
Assouline explores the impact of ideology on language contact in the context of a linguistic minority that opposes the majority language. The minority language is the Yiddish spoken by several small and segregated ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities in Israel, who maintain Yiddish as a spoken language in daily used, in spite of the ever-growing pressure of the majority language--Israeli Hebrew.
In 2015, a group in Richmond, B.C., filed a human rights complaint after a series of condo meetings were held in Mandarin only, given that it was the majority language in the building.
They also analyze each tradition's semantic repertoire; the status of the tradition's majority language; media ecology, as envisioned by the tradition; and the subjects of research taken on "in Communication studies" (p.
Whether a community adopts the majority language or maintains its own is dependent on a number of variables such as the numerical strength of the group in relation to other minorities and majorities, socioeconomic class, educational background, settlement patterns, ties with the homeland, extent of exogamous marriage, attitudes of majority and minority groups, government policy and institutional support, and language use patterns (Romaine 1995).
Frequently referred to as a "locale," this combination of factors could define a country and its majority language or a domestic market with a minority language.
This idea comes to prominence in the idea that speakers of the majority language have a strong sense of identification that can lead to wider language involvement and language vitality in any given community (Giles & Johnson, 1987).
In this article I argue that interpreters are needed not only by ethnic minority children who speak the majority language either poorly or not at all, but also, and perhaps counter-intuitively, by a broader group of ethnic minority children and their families.
Becoming dominant in the majority language (i.e., English) seems to be a common phenomenon among second-generation Korean-American youth.