maitake


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maitake

(mī-tä′kē, -kĕ)
n.
An edible polypore mushroom (Grifola frondosa) native to Japan and North America that produces large clusters of overlapping gray or brown fan-shaped caps, grows at the base of trees or in cultivation, and is prized in Japanese cuisine and used as a dietary supplement. Also called hen of the woods.

maitake

Herbal medicine
A mushroom (Grifola frondoa) that lowers blood pressure and enhances the immune system by increasing natural killer cell activity, increasing release of interleukin-1 and stimulating cytotoxic T cells; it inhibits growth of experimental tumours.
References in periodicals archive ?
Maitake mushrooms are such a difficult species to grow due to biological limitations strapped to its DNA.
How to consume them: Fresh maitake mushrooms are hard to find, but you may find them in specialist Japanese or Chinese stores.
* Freshly-cut hardwood logs (oak) with intact bark can be used right away to grow Maitake, since this mushroom grows at the base of older living trees.
Maitake: King of Mushrooms, Keats Publishing, 1997.
Both Shiitake and Maitake mushrooms have also been found to be formidable cancer fighters.
Martin also urges retailers to consider merchandising Eden dried maitake and shiitake mushrooms in either the produce or meat departments--or both.
A number of researchers have particularly focused their attention on one of these mushrooms called maitake (Grifola frondosa) mushroom.
The Findings: Several varieties of mushrooms are esteemed for their medicinal properties, notably shiitake, maitake and reishi.
RECENT medical research indicates that a supplement called Maitake can help control the HIV virus.
Popular mushroom varieties leveraged for their immune health benefits include reishi (Ganoderma lucid u m), shii take (Len tin ula edodes), maitake (GI[degrees]la fron-dosa), and turkey tail (Coriolus or Tram-des versicolor).
SX-Fraction, a maitake extract product from Mushroom Wisdom Inc., is the subject of a new research paper by Dr.
To provide vitamin I data for SR 22 for almost all mushrooms commonly found in grocery stores, a study to analyze White, Portabella (including commercially UV exposed now available at retail), Maitake, Enoki, Shiitake, Oyster, Crimini, Morel, and Chanterelle mushrooms was undertaken in co-operation with the Nutrient Data Laboratory.