mainstream

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mainstream

adjective Referring to conventional (i.e., non-alternative or non-complementary) medicine or medical practice.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results presented here clearly do not support the contention that postsecondary schools of education provide sufficient coursework and field experience to prepare general education students for integrated or mainstreamed classroom settings.
We recommend that postsecondary schools of education require more coursework and engage in strict supervision of field-based practicum settings relevant to mainstreamed classrooms.
While regular teachers describe mainstreamed students' success in terms of their classroom academic behavior, they may assign report card grades on the basis of their effort and attitude.
Participants were 14 elementary and 19 junior high students in self-contained special education classes for students with mild disabilities who were mainstreamed for at least one academic subject every day and for whom parent permission was obtained.
TABLE 1 Characteristics of Mainstreamed Students with Mild Disabilities, by School Level Elementary Junior High Variable (n = 14) (n = 19) Sex Male 10 8 Female 4 11 Ethnic background Black 3 5 Hispanic 4 2 Other 1 1 White 6 11 Special education category Emotionally disturbed 12 4 Learning disabled 2 15 Mainstream class Reading/English[a] 14 5 Math - 4 Social studies - 5 Science - 5 [a] The English classes into which students were mainstreamed in the junior high schools were primarily basic skills reading and writing classes.
Selected special education students were mainstreamed into reading classes based on their reading ability, as determined by their special education teacher and the Committee on Special Education.
In the junior high schools, students were mainstreamed in their areas of strength into individual subject classes, often in the low track classes for low-achieving students.
As a comparison group, five students were selected at random in each of the regular academic classes into which the sample of students with disabilities were mainstreamed. Standardized reading test scores, final grades, and attendance data were collected for both groups from school records.
Reading ability of the mainstreamed and regular elementary students were also compared.
The regular teachers of the mainstream classes completed a brief questionnaire in May 1986, indicating the academic behavior of the mainstreamed students in the sample.
At the end of the academic year, data from school records included attendance of the mainstreamed students (total number of days absent in the school year), final report card grades in the mainstream subject, and standardized reading test scores administered in April 1986 for mainstreamed students and their regular class peers at both school levels.