maim

(redirected from maimed)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

maim

(mām) [ME. maymen, to cripple]
1. To injure seriously; to disable.
2. To deprive of the use of a part, such as an arm or leg.
References in classic literature ?
This old gentleman, on carefully examining the maimed chair, discovered that its broken leg might be clamped with iron and made as serviceable as ever.
While some of the surest marksmen advanced cautiously with their rifles into the rough ground, four of the best mounted horsemen took their stations in the plain, to run the bulls down should they only be maimed.
What I mean by a perfect man is one who develops under perfect conditions; one who is not wounded, or worried or maimed, or in danger.
There is defiance in the remaining stumps of her masts, raised up like maimed limbs against the menacing scowl of a stormy sky; there is high courage in the upward sweep of her lines towards the bow; and as soon as, on a hastily-rigged spar, a strip of canvas is shown to the wind to keep her head to sea, she faces the waves again with an unsubdued courage.
He was returning from Oechalia, where Eurytus lived and reigned, and boasted that he would surpass even the Muses, daughters of aegis-bearing Jove, if they should sing against him; whereon they were angry, and maimed him.
There be now, for martial encouragement, some degrees and orders of chivalry; which nevertheless are conferred promiscuously, upon soldiers and no soldiers; and some remembrance perhaps, upon the scutcheon; and some hospitals for maimed soldiers; and such like things.
Many are deformed, others maimed, while the majority, Thuvia explained, are sightless.
With respect to the exposing or bringing up of children, let it be a law, that nothing imperfect or maimed shall be brought up, .
How they showed their scars and sores, and piteously pointed to their maimed and crooked limbs, and begged with their pleading eyes for charity
Biting, and striking with his huge hands, he killed and maimed a dozen ere the balance could escape to the upper terraces of the forest.
Not only on that day, as he rode over the battlefield strewn with men killed and maimed (by his will as he believed), did he reckon as he looked at them how many Russians there were for each Frenchman and, deceiving himself, find reason for rejoicing in the calculation that there were five Russians for every Frenchman.
She needed time to get used to her maimed consciousness, her poor lopped life, before she could walk steadily to the place allotted her.