maieutics


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maieutics

Medspeak
An obsolete term for obstetrics, see there.
 
Philosophy
A pedagogical method which holds that every human has the capacity to understand truth, which remains latent until it is “given birth” by the Socratic method of challenging questions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Referring to Mallarme as an "accoucheur d'esprits" reinforces the comparison of his "procede" with Socrates's in that it directly recalls the etymology of maieutics; in the Theaetetus, Socrates likens his teaching method to midwifery.
The teacher needs to be able to streamline the method to each student's individual vocal character and natural potential by means of a kind of Socratic maieutics." (A footnote explains, "That is, not instilling art but rather extracting it from the soul of the student.") Based on the belief that voice students who expect to sing today's standard classical repertory, especially the operatic repertory, must school their voices both technically and emotionally with the study of vocalises before attempting the study and performance of difficult works, editor Elio Battaglia has compiled a comprehensive course of study in this publication.
This 'paradox of exteriorisation' has as its implication the fact that 'the human and the tool [or the Who and the What] invent each other, that there is something like a technical maieutics', ibid., p175.
His philosophical method is a form of therapy, which some see as Socrates 'maieutics'; a method which can and is utilised in psychotherapy.
Incidentally, an in-depth appraisal of Levinas would bring us to welcome two highly controversial positions: Cartesian dualism (for only a separate self can envision infinity as well as externality or otherness) as well as a reassessment of education as encounter with exteriority rather than maieutics.
Admittedly, in another text, Caputo does prescribe that religion means to make oneself worthy of the graceful events in one's life; however, even in that context, he emphasizes the inevitability of the call, not in the Heideggerian sense of the conscience's inner call to authenticity, (7) but of the solicitation directed toward the self from outside, from the other who solicits us in the vocative case, "addressing us unconditionally." (8) He is too good a Kierkegaardian to embrace a redemption more contingent on the maieutics ("midwifery") of Socrates than on the metanoetics ("repentance") of Jesus.
(1: 359) Socrates, as an expert in maieutics, helped his disciples discover their ability to think.
Delany's technique of dialogue often rests on the principle of Greek maieutics. The orator, whether Blake or Placido, arrives at truth by exhausting his interlocutors' objections.
It is in these pedagogic contexts that Socrates makes the strongest claims about his discursive practice, professing to a kind of technical knowledge he variously characterizes as knowledge of erotics, (68) the practice of the one true political art, (69) or his participation in the art of maieutics. (70) It is also in these contexts that we see Socrates associated with the drugs and wizardry Diotima attributes to the resourcefulness of the daimon Eros.
We sense it in such comments as Levinas's "Teaching is not reducible to maieutics [the Socratic method]; it comes from the exterior and brings me more than I can contain,"(38) and Norman O.
He is quite insistent that we recognize that teaching is more than maieutics, the technique of helping the student to recall the truth that is latent within himself or herself.
Such concern for the pacific inbreaking of newness, Robert Gibbs maintains, distinguishes Socratic maieutics from many other forms of education: "maieutics preserves the integrity of the learner from the violence of a force exercised against the learner, [and] teaching ...