virginity

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Related to maidenhood: maidenhead

vir·gin·i·ty

(vĭr-jin'i-tē),
The virgin state.
[L. virginitas]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

virginity

Sexual naivté Never having engaged in sexual congress, intercourse; the classic finding in ♀virgins is an intact hymen. See Abstinence, Hymen.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

vir·gin·i·ty

(vĭr-jin'i-tē)
The virgin state.
[L. virginitas]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
maidenhood could be measured so conclusively and objectively once the
Indeed, while in the paintings Smith draws a sharp distinction between the Scholar and Maidenhood by way of composition, body positioning, and colour (the full-colour Scholar plate contains the most vibrant instances of colour in the series, while the Maidenhood scene is depicted in muted greens, beiges, and browns), Wells ties the ages together, positing education as the empowering experience that might lead girls to imagine alternative possibilities for their lives.
The latter, they say sho ld not be contracted and encouraged...Again, marriages in advanced ages presume that she had made the most of her time during the period of her maidenhood; in fact enjoyed life, while marriage on the contrary means more sober and more restricted life....In the East, it is just the reverse.
One major problem usually Arab Americans face in America is the future of their daughters in terms of the moral context of life in the West, particularly regarding their maidenhood, sexual behavior, marriage to an Arab male, and procreating Arab children who can and will maintain and preserve their original Arab culture.
While her association with the moon thus signifies her loss of maidenhood, it is not entirely clear that after meeting Romeo, Juliet will ever again stand in the sunlight, much less in place of it.
1895 by Frances Benjamin Johnston, writes Burns, "challenges older Victorian ideals of chaste maidenhood, it is also the subversive sign of her modernity." (p.
Bartlett recalled how: The war had affected the sculptor deeply, and he wished to do something to give expression to what he felt, and as there was no subject in his country's history which appealed to him so forcibly as the rich and tragic life of the peasant girl of Domremy, he resolved to commemorate both by making an equestrian statue of the patriot martyr; representing her in all the simple pride of her pure maidenhood as she held the banner of her beloved France toward heaven, as the source from whence she believed the divine mandate had come that was to enable her to free her country from the invaders.
If a woman, who is in her father's house and still in the age of her maidenhood, and should vow something and constrain herself by an oath, if her father should become cognizant of the vow, which has been promised and the oath by which she obligated her own soul and he shall remain silent, she will be liable to the vow.
All this changes after her marriage, which Andrew presents as her salvation since it (he) rescues her from the "metaphysical outrage" of lesbianism or old maidenhood. Immediately after the ceremony, Peggy acquires the habit of crying, happily, at the drop of a hat, as if this is a positive sign of femininity she had been obliged to repress.
Maidenhood and marriage: the reproductive lives of the girls and women from Xeste 3, Thera.
The seances are organised by Tennyson's sister Emily, once engaged to Hallam, who however failed to live up to the icon of perpetual grieving maidenhood and married somebody else, to the disapproval of not only both families but most of the Victorian reading public.
How fever'd is the man who cannot look Upon his mortal days with temperate blood, Who vexes all the leaves of his life's book, And robs his fair name of its maidenhood; It is as if the rose should pluck herself, Or the ripe plum finger its misty bloom, As if a Naid, like a meddling elf, Should darken her pure grot with muddy gloom; But the rose leaves herself upon the briar, For winds to kiss and grateful bees to feed, And the ripe plum still wears its dim attire, The undisturbed lake has crystal space; Why then should man, teasing the world for grace, Spoil his salvation for a fierce miscreed?