magnocellular cell

magnocellular cell

A fast conducting neuron of the visual system which is located within the magnocellular layer of the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus, so named because of its large size compared to parvocellular cells. Magnocellular cells are responsible for resolving motion and coarse outlines in the context of visual perception; they receive input from the axons of parasol cells exiting the optic tract and send their information via the optic radiations to the visual cortices, possibly modifying the signal light editing and gating via top-down control.
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It has been suggested that the level of the pituitary stalk section is the major determinant of permanent DI: the closer the lesion to the magnocellular cell bodies in the hypothalamus, the more likely that the hypothalamic cell bodies will degenerate, resulting in permanent DI.
Recent SD-OCT studies, however, suggest that the retinal ganglion cells in the macular region are damaged even in early-stage glaucoma.[30],[31],[32] The central 16-test point analysis in the current study on the pattern deviation of HFA corresponded to the 5[degrees]-10[degrees] of the Bjerrum area where almost half of the magnocellular cells are distributed.[9],[10],[11],[12] In the present study, the number of abnormal test points for each possible criterion negatively correlated with the SNR (negative r value), even though the correlation was significant at only for P < 0.5%, and the correlation tended to be significant at P < 2%.
This means that magnocellular cells are not responsible for processing the colour of a scene, and similarly they do not contribute much towards the fine spatial detail which would be crucial for recognising or identifying stimuli in the visual world.