variation

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var·i·a·tion

(var'ē-ā'shŭn),
1. Deviation from type, especially the parent type, in structure, form, physiology, or behavior.
2. Synonym(s): type (3)
[L. variatio, fr. vario, to change, vary]

variation

(vâr′ē-ā′shən, văr′-)
n.
1.
a. The act, fact, or process of varying.
b. The extent or degree to which something varies: a variation of ten pounds in weight.
2. Biology The existence within a species or other group of organisms of differences in form, function, or behavior, especially when hereditary.

var′i·a′tion·al adj.

var·i·a·tion

(var'ē-ā'shŭn)
Deviation from the type, especially the parent type, in structure, form, physiology, or behavior.
[L. variatio, fr. vario, to change, vary]

variation

  1. ecophenotypic variation (see ECOPHENOTYPE caused by local factors, as opposed to genetic factors, in an organism.
  2. any differences (both genotypic and phenotypic) between individuals in a population or between parents and their offspring. see GENETIC VARIABILITY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because VORs are updated at different times, you can find very different inbound and outbound courses on a victor airway because of different magnetic variation.
Airport magnetic variation is updated more frequently than VORs to maintain approach criteria.
The magnetic variation used in charts also varies depending on the situation.
In this same context, another alignment with less magnetic variations in relation to the ones described above is also observed.
This study shows that the volcanic building presents four different magnetic behaviors characterized by magnetic variations in the eastern slope, in the limit of protovolcano caldera, in the floor of the protovolcano (El Playon) and those correlated with areas of weakness like faults and/or fractures.
Researchers who learn to control the chaotic amplification of tiny fluctuations in the magnetic environment may find themselves able to sense extremely small magnetic variations in biological tissues and other samples.
Solar magnetic variations leave a long-term record in the form of carbon-14 in tree rings, she notes, because when the magnetism is stronger, less carbon-14 is produced in Earth's upper atmosphere and less finds its way into the tree rings.