magnetic moment

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magnetic moment

Etymology: Gk, magnesia, lodestone, momentum, movement
a measure of the net magnetic field produced by an elementary particle or an atomic nucleus spinning about its own axis. Such fields are similar to the field surrounding a bar magnet and are the basis for magnetic resonance imaging.

magnetic moment

An MRI term for a measure of the net magnetic properties of an object or particle, which is a sum of the intrinsic spins of the nuclei that have an associated magnetic dipole moment interacting with a magnetic field.

magnetic moment,

n the twisting force experienced by a magnet located inside a magnetic field.
References in periodicals archive ?
He says the work's most significant contribution is the Penning trap setup: It should also be able to measure the magnetic moment of the antiproton.
In the crystal that the MIT researchers studied, each particle constantly changes its magnetic moment.
For magnetic nanoparticles in a fluid, where the magnetic moment is locked in place in the lattice, the Brownian time constant is defined as [[tau].
These can be made visible by their interaction with the neutrons which themselves carry a magnetic moment.
No atoms in the compound have the requisite electronic configurations to generate magnetic moments, Ott says.
Their net spin determines the strength of the atom's magnetic "moment," and because they tend to occur in pairs that cancel each other out, it is the atom's unpaired electrons that contribute to its magnetic moment.
These properties include, among others, the saturation and remanent magnetic moments, and the intrinsic coercivity.
The influence of one layer's inherent magnetization reached through the spacing layer, causing the next magnetic layer to align its magnetic moments in the opposite direction.
His research was performed at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois and focused on measuring the magnetic moments and other properties of exotic subatomic particles.
The purple arrows indicate the magnetic moments of the iron ions.
For example, whether the magnetic moments are all pointing in the same direction or curling around a disk to form vortices.
This was accomplished by first collecting data from disks that had been prepared to have the magnetic moments of the clusters randomly oriented.