hysteresis

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hysteresis

 [his-tĕ-re´sis]
1. the failure of coincidence of two associated phenomena, such as that exhibited in the differing temperatures of gelation and of liquefaction of a reversible colloid.
2. a phenomenon exhibited by a physical system in which the system's response to an outside influence depends not only on the instantaneous magnitude of the influence but also on the system's previous history, as when a material undergoing cyclical loading exhibits a loss of energy between cycles of loading and unloading.
3. in cardiac pacing terminology, the number of pulses per minute below the programmed pacing rate that the heart must drop in order to cause initiation of pacing; it can be programmed in by a pulse generator.

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'ter-ē'sis),
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause. Synonym(s): magnetic inertia
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance, such as reversible hydrocolloid, melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. The basis of a type of cooperativity observed in many enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme. Compare: allosterism, cooperativity.
5. The nonlinear nature of the pressure-volume curve of the lung in which transpulmonary pressure at a given volume during inflation is less than the transpulmonary pressure at the same volume during exhalation.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
1. Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
2. The lag of a magnetic effect behind its cause.
3. The temperature differential that exists when a substance melts at one temperature and solidifies at another.
4. A type of cooperativity in enzyme-catalyzed reactions in which the degree of cooperativity is associated with a slow conformational change of the enzyme.
Compare: allosterism
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]

hys·ter·e·sis

(his'tĕr-ē'sis)
Failure of either one of two related phenomena to keep pace with the other; or any situation in which the value of one depends on whether the other has been increasing or decreasing.
[G. hysterēsis, a coming later]
References in periodicals archive ?
The magnetic hysteresis exhibited by gadolinium is quite low and Dan'kov et al.
We tested for magnetic hysteresis using the main watt apparatus in a series of "zero-field" measurements.
The magnetic hysteresis model[3] describes the relationship between the internal magnetic field and the partial magnetization M as
Wohlfarth, "A mechanism of magnetic hysteresis in heterogeneous alloys," Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, vol.
Feliachi, "A neural network for incorporating the thermal effect on the magnetic hysteresis of the 3F3 material using the Jiles-Atherton model," Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials, vol.
As one of the most widely used hysteresis models, the Jiles-Atherton (J-A) model [5,6] characterizes magnetic hysteresis through the reversible and irreversible dipole switching mechanisms and energy losses (domain wall losses) relative to the equilibrium anhysteretic magnetization.
The magnetic hysteresis (M-H) loops of first three samples are shown in Figure 6 and the last three are shown in Figure 7, displaying a weak ferromagnetic behavior.
Figure 4 shows the magnetic hysteresis loops of the (Sm,Pr)C[O.sub.5] nanoflakes and the (Sm,Pr)C[O.sub.5]/Fe nanocomposites with 15wt.% Fe content.
For storage applications, it is interesting to compare the magnetic hysteresis loops of pure Co nanowires and Ag/Co multilayered nanowires.
We have investigated magnetic hysteresis in transport critical-current ([I.sub.c]) measurements of Ag-matrix
When a magnetic field is applied the material's temperature changes in microseconds with only a small amount of magnetic hysteresis. This entropy change is similar to that in a conventional refrigerator in which a vapor or gas responds to imposed changes in pressure or volume.
The magnetic hysteresis loops were measured at room temperature with maximal applied magnetic field up to 0.95 T.