magnet therapy


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magnet therapy

n.
An alternative medical therapy in which the placement of magnets or magnetic devices on the skin is thought to prevent or treat symptoms of disease, especially pain.
A general term for any allegedly therapeutic effect evoked by special magnets or magnetic fields; magnet therapy has a long tradition in many cultures—e.g., Arab, Chinese, Egyptian, Greek, Hebrew, Roman, and the Indian subcontinent

magnet therapy

The application of permanent magnets to painful regions of the human body in an attempt to alleviate chronic diseases or chronic pain.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effectiveness of magnet therapy for treatment of wrist pain attributed to carpal tunnel syndrome.
Now dubbed the biggest equine magnet therapy bandage company in North America, The Best Bandages was established in 2005 after Sandy, decided to.
They said that so-called controlled experiments of magnet therapy were "suspect" because it was difficult to blind participants to thepresence of a magnet.
The professors also said: "Money spent on expensive and unproved magnet therapy might be better spent on evidence-based medicine.
They said so-called controlled experiments of magnet therapy were 'suspect' because it was difficult to blind participants to the presence of a magnet.
Rider Kim Phelan, a student at Huddersfield New College, has spoken about how her 19-year-old horse, Sparky, benefited from magnet therapy.
Tried and tested WHEN I tested the magnet therapy, I tried it out by using a Haematite bracelet.
handles distribution of this product in the East, under the name "Magnet Therapy."
If you have a horse suffering from aches and pains, magnet therapy could be the answer, says Vicky Armitage of Bioflow.
This accounts for the success of fad diets, sex stimulators, heart-healthy candy bars, enema therapies, copper bracelets, magnet therapy and several billion dollars of other health enhancers.
that whole constellation of everything from folk remedies to traditional healing practices known as "alternative therapy." I've been open--perhaps too open--in my curiosity about everything from Indonesian jamu and Chinese Qi gong, to magnet therapy and even "past-life regression."