magma

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magma

 [mag´mah]
1. a thick, viscous, aqueous suspension of finely divided, insoluble, inorganic material.
2. a thin, pastelike substance composed of organic material.

mag·ma

(mag'mă),
1. A soft mass left after extraction of the active principles.
2. A salve or thick paste.
[G. a soft mass or salve, fr. massō, to knead]

magma

/mag·ma/ (mag´mah)
1. a thick, viscous, aqueous suspension of finely divided, insoluble, inorganic material.
2. a thin, pastelike substance composed of organic material.

magma

(măg′mə)
n. pl. mag·mata (-mä′tə) or mag·mas
Pharmacology A suspension of particles in a liquid, such as milk of magnesia.

mag·mat′ic (-măt′ĭk) adj.

mag·ma

(mag'mă)
1. A soft mass left after extraction of the active principles.
2. A salve or thick paste.
[G. a soft mass or salve, fr. massō, to knead]

magma

1. a suspension of finely divided material in a small amount of water.
2. a thin, paste-like substance composed of organic material.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence, the mafic and ultramafic intrusions of the region, some of which have compositional and geochemical characteristics comparable with those of the Qullinaaraaluk pluton (Baker 2005; Cheve 2005), constitute a highly prospective metallotect for magmatic Ni-Cu-PGE deposit.
In addition," Regoci continued, "with this exciting new information regarding tenor, we now have evidence to target high-grade magmatic sulphide zones with a more robust grade profile than shallow historical drilling outlined in the 1960's at Nickel Mountain.
I use "mafic magmatism" as a shorthand here, but mean to include all mantle-derived magmatic activity other than steady-state arc magmatism; that is, all basalt ([+ or -] komatiite)-dominated and (or) bimodal magmatism associated with divergent margins, or more generally extensional regimes, intraplate magmatic provinces, mantle plumes, anorogenic provinces, kimberlite and alkaline provinces.
The paintings are often flanked by photographic fragments that, for a moment, lead the mind to a definite place, a fragment of reality that contrasts with the magmatic delirium of the painting, which, instead, deliberately brings to mind a "non-place.
For researchers who have used multibeam systems in their studies, "the data have been like allowing us to remove several layers of opaque glass and get closer to an accurate definition of the seafloor," says Jeff Fox at the University of Rhode Island at Narragansett, who uses academic Seabeam systems in his research on the magmatic and tectonic processes at mid-oceanic ridges.
Huckleberry is being explored as a large-scale segregated magmatic deposit.
Although no magmatic eruption is imminent, Phivolcs still urged the public to refrain from going near the six-kilometer radius permanent danger zone "due to the perennial life-threatening dangers of rockfalls, landslides/avalanches at the middle to upper slope, sudden ash puffs and steam-driven or phreatic eruptions from the summit.
Evolution of an Andean margin; a tectonic and magmatic view from the Andes to the Neuquen Basin (35 degrees-39 degrees S lat).
After all, it is only sedimentary rocks that continuously encrypt in their records (notwithstanding that individual pages of the chronicle may be scattered over the different continents or even lost) the nature and architecture of the contemporaneous lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere, that along with tectonic and magmatic events, control ore-forming processes.
Based upon Australia's Ellendale lamproite pipe, historical records at the Crater, and petrologic evidence, the magmatic lamproite would not be a high-priority candidate for bulk sampling investigations.
And without geothermal vents steaming with gases from below, it is not the kind of region in which geochemists go hunting for chemical clues of magmatic rumblings underfoot.