magical thinking


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thinking

 [thingk´ing]
ideational mental activity (in contrast to emotional activity); the flow of ideas, symbols, and associations that brings forth concepts and reasons.
autistic thinking self-absorption; preoccupation with inner thoughts, daydreams, fantasies, delusions, drives, and personal logic. It is egocentric, subjective thinking lacking objectivity and preferring a narcissistic, inner, private reality to that with external validity. Used interchangeably with dereistic thinking, although differing in emphasis. Called also autism.
critical thinking a style of reasoning that involves a complex process of reflection and analysis. See accompanying table.
dereistic thinking thinking not in accordance with the facts of reality and experience and following illogical, idiosyncratic reasoning. Used interchangeably with autistic thinking, although not an exact synonym: dereistic emphasizes disconnection from reality and autistic emphasizes preoccupation with inner experience. Called also dereism.
magical thinking that characterized by the belief that thinking or wishing something can cause it to occur.
primary process thinking in psychoanalytic theory, primitive thought processes deriving from the id and marked by illogical form, preverbal content, an emphasis on immediate wish fulfillment, and an equating of thought and action. Such processes are characteristic of childhood and of dreams.
secondary process thinking in psychoanalytic theory, the more sophisticated thought processes, based on logic, obeying the rules of causality, and consistent with external reality. Such processes are characteristic of mature conscious thought.

magical thinking

irrational belief that one can bring about a circumstance or event by thinking about it or wishing for it; normal in preschool children, it also occurs in schizophrenia.
The erroneous belief, similar to a normal stage of childhood development—Piaget’s pre-operational phase—that thoughts assume a magical power capable of influencing events without a physical action actually occurring; a conviction that thinking equates with doing, accompanied by an unrealistic understanding of cause and effect
Examples Dreams in children, in primitive peoples, and in patients under various conditions

magical thinking

Psychology Dereitic thinking, similar to a normal stage of childhood development, in which thoughts, words or actions assume a magical power, and are able to prevent or cause events to happen without a physical action occurring; a conviction that thinking equates with doing, accompanied by an unrealistic understanding of cause and effect Examples Dreams in children, in primitive peoples, and in Pts under various conditions

mag·ic·al think·ing

(maji-kăl thingking)
Irrational belief that one can bring about a circumstance or event by thinking about it or wishing for it; normal in preschool children, it also occurs in schizophrenia.

mag·ic·al think·ing

(maji-kăl thingking)
Irrational belief that one can bring about a circumstance or event by thinking about it or wishing for it.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our study provided a novel finding relative to the relationship between magical thinking and greater environmental mastery and personal growth.
Treating Caliban's body as the expression of his behavior, Shakespeare's magician epitomizes the structure of consciousness now called magical thinking. This habit of thought was first critiqued in David Hume's Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748), specifically in the chapter "Of the Connexion of Ideas," which describes the "gentle force" of "attraction" that unites adjacent ideas in our imagination and keeps them connected in our memory, its varieties being three: resemblance, contiguity, and cause and effect.
Moreover, can the nation's many grave problems--income inequality, a disintegrating infrastructure, the erosion of shared American values, to cite a few--really be attributed to magical thinking? Andersen thinks so.
Those of us who have some khowledge of firearms recognize the magical thinking at work.
For someone dismissive of "magical thinking," this logic would be inadmissible absent the Iran factor.
"Magical thinking is the childlike belief that we are able to control outcomes and change the world around us through the intensity of our wishes and desires ...
Some of today's parents have abandoned science for magical thinking and unproven/disproven ideas, primarily because there hasn't been much consequence of their doing so, until now.
In The Year of Magical Thinking, her wrenching memoir of the year following the death of her husband John Gregory Dunne, Joan Didion describes the episodes of magical thinking that forestalled her acceptance of Dunne's sudden absence from her life.
If this "magic" number seems like magical thinking to you, you may be right.
In 2011 she appeared in the play based on Joan Didion's 2005 novel The Year of Magical Thinking in the Theatre de l'Atelier,
The modern nullification movement relies on magical thinking. As Gov.