maggots


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maggots

Eyeless, short-lived, worm-like larvae of flies that are devoid of appendages but are able to feed on organic matter and often help to clean septic wounds. Maggots acquired a new respectability in the year 2004 when they became prescribable on the British National Health Service under the brand name Larve. One or two applications, each lasting for up to three days, during which the maggots are restrained by a net, have been found effective in cleaning up most wounds. See also MYIASIS.
References in periodicals archive ?
She said: "When they first mentioned it I was squeamish, but I wanted him to have the best treatment possible and it seemed maggots were the only way.
A NEW antibiotic derived from maggots has been developed that can tackle a plethora of problem bugs, including 12 different strains of MRSA, researchers said yesterday.
The arrival of antibiotics in the 20th Century meant the use of maggots fell out of favour, but the practice is now making a comeback and is used today in some hospitals in the UK.
Researchers from Manchester University used the maggots to treat diabetic patients who had contracted MRSA in foot ulcers.
She stressed that only sterilised maggots will do - this isn't a treatment you would try at home.
Wounds could be deliberately infested with maggots, which eat dead flesh, the MPs said.
has agreed to produce decoys for large-scale tests on apple maggot flies and related insects such as the blueberry maggot fly, cherry fruit fly and walnut husk fly.
Now maggots have become accepted treatment for wounds that prove to be resistant to more conventional techniques.
For what type of Doctors may use maggots Leeches are sometimes
Although Medicare and other insurers will pay for the physician's services, they will not yet pay for the maggots.
There are two choice - pole fished corn, meat and worms ion the margins or waggler-fished red maggots and catch carp on Lark and Linnet lakes.
FORGOTTEN BY MEDICINE: During the Civil War, Confederate physician Forney Zacharias applied maggots to soldiers' wounds to remove gangrenous tissue, saving many lives in the process.