macrosomic


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Related to macrosomic: Large for gestational age

macrosomic

adjective Pertaining to or characterised by macrosomia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Medics say it increases the likelihood of mothers dying in labour, while macrosomic babies with see-sawing blood levels will have to be weaned off sugar dependency.
The women who did not embark on any scheduled exercise had the highest number for low birthweight infants; the only macrosomic case was also in this group.
N-3 fatty acids modulate antioxidant status in diabetic rats and their macrosomic offspring.
The macrosomic baby also has a risk of developing low blood sugar and should be checked soon after birth.
Maternal and fetal outcomes such as prolonged labor with increased use of oxytocin, genital laceration, cesarean section, postpartum hemorrhage, shoulder dystocia, and neonatal asphyxia are more commonly encountered with macrosomic infants (>4,000 g) (1,2) Accurate prediction of macrosomia may alert the physician and staff and enable them to prepare for shoulder dystocia.
In the index study the great discrepancy between SF measurements plotted [greater than or equal to] 90th centile, as well as the number of macrosomic babies born, illustrates this point.
In an observational cohort study of 235 pregnancies at term in which US measurements led to a diagnosis of fetal macrosomia, only about a third of the infants were actually macrosomic at birth.
In women with normal random blood glucose level, an oral glucose tolerance test was performed if they had persistent glucosuria, they developed polyhydramnios, or the fetus became macrosomic.
Intrapartum detection of a macrosomic fetus: clinical versus 8 sonographic models.
An expert's deposition in a case alleging failure to diagnose that an infant would be macrosomic.
Evidence clearly points toward an increase in adolescent and adult obesity in infants who are born either large for gestational age or who are macrosomic.