macrosmatic

mac·ros·mat·ic

(mak'roz-mat'ik),
Denoting an abnormally keen olfactory sense.
[macro- + G. osmē, smell]

macrosmatic

(măk″rŏs-măt′ĭk) [″ + osmasthai, to smell]
Having an abnormally keen sense of smell.

macrosmatic

pertaining to a good sense of smell, e.g. macrosmatic animals such as dogs.
References in periodicals archive ?
A major component of social chemosignaling in macrosmatic mammals is conveying of social status, namely dominance/submissiveness.
The differences between the human and canine nasal passages that make dogs more macrosmatic (keen-scented) lie not only in the amount of nerve receptors and cilia in its tissue (or epithelium) used to pick up scents, but also in the way the two sections are separated in dogs and other keen-scented animals.
In dogs, cats, horses, and other macrosmatic mammals, smell is of much greater importance.
Many four-legged animals including dogs have a keen sense of smell and are macrosmatic, which means they have a greater level of olfactory function with a complex nose design, as well as a large olfactory lobe in the brain.