macroparasite


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mac·ro·par·a·site

(mak'rō-par'ă-sīt),
A parasite, such as a louse or an intestinal worm, that is visible to the naked eye.

macroparasite

Those parasites (e.g., helminths, arthropods) that do not multiply within their definitive host, cycling instead through transmission stages (eggs and larvae), which pass to the outside. Immune responses evoked by macroparasites are transient and depend on the parasite load; the key epidemiologic measure is the number of parasites per host.

macroparasite

Infectious disease A parasite–eg, helminths, arthropods–which does not multiply in its definitive host, cycling instead through transmission stages–eggs and larvae–which pass into the external environment; immune responses evoked by macroparasites are transient and depend on the parasite load. Cf Microparasite.
References in periodicals archive ?
Allen, "Macrophage proliferation, provenance, and plasticity in macroparasite infection," Immunological Reviews, vol.
This dynamic is likely to be altered where hosts are coinfected with prevalent endemic macroparasite species (e.g.
Current theoretical and empiric work suggests that the outcome of coinfection can be different even for the same parasite system (e.g., [9]), depending on the level of resource competition between macro- and microparasites [4] or macroparasite burden and pathogenicity [2].
However, although malaria can behave sometimes as a microparasite and sometimes as a macroparasite [33], in the specific context of the proposed model, it can be considered as a microparasitic disease.
Modelling macroparasite aggregation using a nematode-sheep system: the Weibull distribution as an alternative to the Negative Binomial distribution?
Macroparasite infection is the third etiologic hypothesis of amphibian limb abnormality.
Reduction of egg size in natural populations of threespine stickleback infected with a cestode macroparasite. Journal of Parasitology 89:1-6.
Chapter 2: Heterogeneities in macroparasite infections: patterns and processes.