macroparasite


Also found in: Wikipedia.

mac·ro·par·a·site

(mak'rō-par'ă-sīt),
A parasite, such as a louse or an intestinal worm, that is visible to the naked eye.

macroparasite

Those parasites (e.g., helminths, arthropods) that do not multiply within their definitive host, cycling instead through transmission stages (eggs and larvae), which pass to the outside. Immune responses evoked by macroparasites are transient and depend on the parasite load; the key epidemiologic measure is the number of parasites per host.

macroparasite

Infectious disease A parasite–eg, helminths, arthropods–which does not multiply in its definitive host, cycling instead through transmission stages–eggs and larvae–which pass into the external environment; immune responses evoked by macroparasites are transient and depend on the parasite load. Cf Microparasite.
References in periodicals archive ?
This dynamic is likely to be altered where hosts are coinfected with prevalent endemic macroparasite species (e.
Heterogeneities in macroparasite infections: patterns and processes.
Modelling macroparasite aggregation using a nematode-sheep system: the Weibull distribution as an alternative to the Negative Binomial distribution?
Reduction of egg size in natural populations of threespine stickleback infected with a cestode macroparasite.
Chapter 2: Heterogeneities in macroparasite infections: patterns and processes.
Patterns of macroparasite aggregation in wildlife host populations.
Parasite-mediated and direct competition in a two-host shared macroparasite system.
Anderson and Gordon used numerical simulations to investigate stochastic models of macroparasite infection and death and concluded that variation in the parasite's distribution in relation to host age could provide clues about mortality patterns.
Using a dynamic model of parasite transmission that accounts for these reproductive features of macroparasite transmission (Appendix), we examined the impact of treatment coverage and duration of control programs on the emergence of resistant infection, to estimate the time required for drug failure.