macrogamete


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Related to macrogamete: microgamete, Merozoites

macrogamete

 [mak″ro-gam´ēt]
1. the larger, less active female gamete in sexual reproduction, which is fertilized by the smaller male gamete (microgamete).
2. the larger of two types of malarial parasites; see gamete (def. 2).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mac·ro·ga·mete

(mak'rō-gam'ēt),
The female element in anisogamy; it is the larger of the two sex cells, with more reserve material, and usually nonmotile.
Synonym(s): megagamete
[macro- + G. gametē, wife]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

macrogamete

(măk′rō-găm′ēt, -gə-mēt′)
n.
The larger of two conjugating gametes in an anisogamous organism. Also called megagamete.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

macrogamete

The large female gamete of Plasmodium species, which conjugates with the smaller male microgamete to form a zygote that develops into an oocyst, the human arm of the Plasmodium life cycle. The asexual phase occurs in the mosquito.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mac·ro·ga·mete

(mak'rō-gam'ēt)
The female element in anisogamy; it is the larger of the two sex cells, with more reserve material, and usually nonmotile.
[macro- + G. gametē, wife]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

macrogamete

1. The mammalian ovum, which is much larger than the male sex cell, the microgamete or spermatozoon.
2. The female sex cell of the malarial parasite and other PROTOZOA.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

macrogamete

the female gamete, so designated because of its larger size. See ISOGAMY, ANISOGAMY.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Extracellular macrogametes and microgametes may be seen after erythrocytic lysis.
Eukaryotic sex can take place between mating types in isogametic species which lack the differentiation between microgametes or sperm and macrogametes or eggs, the distinction which defines male and female (or their functions in hermaphrodites).
vivax orthologs expressed on both macrogametes and microgametes (Annexures 1 and 2).
Several stages were detected: trophozoites, sporocysts, and gamonts containing macrogametes or microgametes.