macroevolution

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macroevolution

(măk′rō-ĕv′ə-lo͞o′shən, -ē′və-)
n.
Large-scale evolution occurring over a very long period time that results in the formation of new species and higher-level taxonomic groups.

mac′ro·ev′o·lu′tion·ar′y (-shə-nĕr′ē) adj.

macroevolution

A term of art for large-scale evolution of ecologically separated gene pools, which occurs at or above the level of speciation, resulting in relatively large and complex changes such as anagenesis and cladogenesis stasigenesis.

macroevolution

the collective processes by which new species arise and others become extinct.
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A macroevolutionary explanation for energy equivalence in the scaling of body size and population density.
Although macroevolutionary processes are traditionally overlooked in introductory biology courses (Catley, 2006), they are essential for overcoming a number of misconceptions (Padian, 2010).
David Sepkoski's admirable essay on macroevolution addresses both familiar (such as the pace of evolution and the ontological status of evolutionary units) and not so familiar issues (such as whether microevolutionary mechanisms explain macroevolutionary patterns).
Insects on plants: macroevolutionary chemical trends in host use.
Gould (2002) indicated that the study of microevolution provides little, if any, information about macroevolutionary patterns.
Such small changes are called "microevolution." The Macroevolution Conference of 1980, however, decided that, contrary to theory, microevolutionary changes did not add up to macroevolutionary changes.
Macroevolutionary consequences of developmental mode in temnopleurid echinoids from the tertiary of Southern Australia.
A systems-analytical approach to macroevolutionary phenomena.
Macroevolutionary relationships of species of Drosophila melanogaster group based on mtDNA sequences.
(97.) Phyletic gradualism is a macroevolutionary hypothesis rooted in the notion of uniformitarianism (see below).
This provides us with a way to estimate the age of human populations that is not necessarily linked to a macroevolutionary process.