macroeconomics

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macroeconomics

study of an economy as a whole; includes the total or aggregate level of output of an economy and prices for the economy, viewed as a whole. See also microeconomics.
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Creating an appropriate macroeconomic framework around aid is essential to manage effectively aid inflows and maximize the benefits from them.
He was promoted to senior economist in 1989, and was named chief of the Macroeconomics and Quantitative Studies Section in 1996.
Expressions of interest for Consulting services for develop developing of methodological recommendations for introduction into Russian practice of statistical tables for calculation Processes to estimate accuracy of Macroeconomic indicators.
At a recent conference organized by the ECB, which was attended by many leading academics and central bankers from all over the world, many of the contributions acknowledged the need for an important "role for money" in monetary policy making and macroeconomic analysis, although opinions differed on how best this should be achieved.
25 Turkey Macroeconomic Indicators and Total Pipe Demand
The use of such technques requires both the clout that comes with supervision and regulation and the understanding of the linkages between supervision and regulation and macroeconomic growth and stability.
Trying to coordinate macroeconomic policies with Japan is almost certainly about to become more important and more exasperating.
1 North America Macroeconomic Indicators & Insulation Demand 98 2 North America Insulation Supply & Demand 101 3 United States Macroeconomic Indicators & Insulation Demand 105 4 United States Insulation Supply & Demand 108 5 Canada Macroeconomic Indicators & Insulation Demand 111 6 Canada Insulation Supply & Demand 114 7 Mexico Macroeconomic Indicators & Insulation Demand 117 8 Mexico Insulation Supply & Demand 120
The estimation of full dynamic effects requires a model that both captures microeconomic and macroeconomic processes and produces reliable long-run forecasts of economic outcomes.
In addition, the core idea of Keynesian economics -- that an activist government could continually pull the levers of monetary and fiscal policy to offset macroeconomic shocks emanating from the private sector -- has long since been discredited.
A sound understanding of the costs and benefits of energy policy and the opportunities and risks, and announced in the first monitoring report of the federal government macroeconomic assessment of the effects of the energy revolution as an integral part of the upcoming, first progress report require a robust scientific analysis of the macroeconomic effects of the energy transition .