macrocephaly


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macrocephaly

 [mak″ro-sef´ah-le]
megalocephaly. adj., adj macroceph´ous.

meg·a·ceph·a·ly

(meg'ă-sef'ă-lē),
A condition, either congenital or acquired, in which the head is abnormally large; usually applied to an adult cranium with a capacity of over 1450 mL.
[mega- + G. kephalē, head]

macrocephaly

/mac·ro·ceph·a·ly/ (-sef´ah-le) megalocephaly; unusually large size of the head.macrocephal´ic

macrocephaly

(măk′rō-sĕf′ə-lē) also

macrocephalia

(-sə-fā′lē-ə, -fāl′yə)
n.
Abnormal largeness of the head. Also called megacephaly, megalocephaly.

mac′ro·ce·phal′ic (-sə-făl′ĭk), mac′ro·ceph′a·lous adj.

macrocephaly

[mak′rōsef′əlē]
Etymology: Gk, makros + kephale, head
a congenital anomaly characterized by abnormal largeness of the head and brain in relation to the rest of the body, resulting in some degree of mental and growth retardation. The head is more than two standard deviations above the average circumference size for age, sex, race, and period of gestation, with excessively wide fontanels; the facial features are usually normal. The condition may be caused by some defect in formation during embryonic development, or it may be the result of progressive degeneration processes, such as Schilder's disease, Greenfield's disease, or congenital lipoidosis. In macrocephaly there is symmetric overgrowth at the head without increased intracranial pressure, as differentiated from hydrocephalus, in which the lateral, asymmetric growth of the head is caused by excessive accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid, usually under increased pressure. Specific diagnostic tests may be necessary to differentiate the two conditions. Treatment is primarily symptomatic, with nursing care concentrated specifically on helping parents learn to care for a brain-damaged child. Also called macrocephalia, megalocephaly. Compare microcephaly. See also hydrocephalus. macrocephalic, macrocephalous, adj., macrocephalus, n.

macrocephaly

An abnormally large head and/or brain; in children, macrocephaly is defined as an occipitofrontal circumference of > 3 SD ≥ the mean.

DiffDx—non-hydrocephalic causes of macrocephaly
Benign familial form (siblings also have large heads), achondroplasia, Banayan syndrome, cerebral gigantism (with macrosomia or Sotos syndrome), cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, fragile X syndrome, Klippel-Trenauny-Weber syndrome, mucopolysaccharidosis, neurofibromatosis, Weaver syndrome.

macrocephaly

↑ head circumference, megalocephaly Pediatrics An abnormally big head/brain; in children, macrocephaly is defined as an occipitofrontal circumference of > 3 SD ≥ the mean; in adults, macrocephaly is any brain weighing > 1800 g, due to expansion of any subdural component–eg, cerebral tissue, liquid, blood, tumor or storage disease DiffDx–non-hydrocephalic causes Benign familial form–sibs also have large heads, achondroplasia, Banayan syndrome, cerebral gigantism–with macrosomia or Sotos syndrome, cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, fragile X syndrome, Klippel-Trenauny-Weber syndrome, mucopolysaccharidosis, neurofibromatosis, Weaver syndrome

meg·a·ceph·a·ly

(meg'ă-sef'ă-lē)
A condition, either congenital or acquired, in which the head is abnormally large; usually applied to an adult cranium with a capacity of over 1450 mL.
Synonym(s): macrocephaly, macrocephalia, megalocephaly, megalocephalia.
[mega- + G. kephalē, head]

macrocephaly

abnormal enlargement of the cranium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Macrocephaly and large sized brains are seen in autism and Neanderthals (Bruner, Manzi, & Arsuaga, 2003).
Key words: Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome, macrocephaly, polysyndactyly
37) Symptoms include mental retardation, bulbar dysfunction, seizures, macrocephaly and spasticity, resulting in death usually by the age of 10 years.
The child with CDG-IId has mental retardation, macrocephaly attributable to a Dandy-Walker malformation with progressive hydrocephalus, myopathy, and blood clotting defects (202).
Lucia, a Puerto Rican mother of a child with severe hypotonia and macrocephaly, was one of mothers who articulated this belief.
McCullough, "Ethical Challenges in Perinatal Medicine: The Intrapartum Management of PregnancyComplicated by Fetal Hydrocephalus with Macrocephaly," Seminars in Perinatology 11, no.
cerebral Alexanders (type 1), which primarily has an infantile onset with the presence of seizures, psychomotor developmental retardation, macrocephaly and abnormalities in the superior frontal cerebral white matter observed in a brain MRI
Among the accepted indications for MRI include microcephaly, macrocephaly, unusual head shapes, regression, or an abnormal neurologic examination.
He had down-slanting palpebral fissures, hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, microphthalmia, low-set ears, macrocephaly, gingival hypertrophia, simian line in both hands, pectus excavatum, sacral dimple, and foot deformity (spontaneous plantar flexion of the fourth metatars).
12) Mean head circumference is larger and rates of macrocephaly higher in autism.
Physical stigmata associated with learning disabilities Physical sign Association Microcephaly Mild/borderline intellectual disability Macrocephaly Sotos' syndrome, neurofibromatosis, Asperger/autistic spectrum disorders Short stature Turner's syndrome Tall stature Klinefelter's syndrome, Sotos' syndrome Obesity/short stature Prader-Willi syndrome, hypothyroidism Ash leaf macules, Tuberous sclerosis shagreen patches, adenoma sebaceum Cafe au lait spots, Neurofibromatosis axillary freckling Mid-face hypoplasia Fetal alcohol syndrome