macrocephaly


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macrocephaly

 [mak″ro-sef´ah-le]
megalocephaly. adj., adj macroceph´ous.

meg·a·ceph·a·ly

(meg'ă-sef'ă-lē),
A condition, either congenital or acquired, in which the head is abnormally large; usually applied to an adult cranium with a capacity of over 1450 mL.
[mega- + G. kephalē, head]

macrocephaly

/mac·ro·ceph·a·ly/ (-sef´ah-le) megalocephaly; unusually large size of the head.macrocephal´ic

macrocephaly

(măk′rō-sĕf′ə-lē) also

macrocephalia

(-sə-fā′lē-ə, -fāl′yə)
n.
Abnormal largeness of the head. Also called megacephaly, megalocephaly.

mac′ro·ce·phal′ic (-sə-făl′ĭk), mac′ro·ceph′a·lous adj.

macrocephaly

[mak′rōsef′əlē]
Etymology: Gk, makros + kephale, head
a congenital anomaly characterized by abnormal largeness of the head and brain in relation to the rest of the body, resulting in some degree of mental and growth retardation. The head is more than two standard deviations above the average circumference size for age, sex, race, and period of gestation, with excessively wide fontanels; the facial features are usually normal. The condition may be caused by some defect in formation during embryonic development, or it may be the result of progressive degeneration processes, such as Schilder's disease, Greenfield's disease, or congenital lipoidosis. In macrocephaly there is symmetric overgrowth at the head without increased intracranial pressure, as differentiated from hydrocephalus, in which the lateral, asymmetric growth of the head is caused by excessive accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid, usually under increased pressure. Specific diagnostic tests may be necessary to differentiate the two conditions. Treatment is primarily symptomatic, with nursing care concentrated specifically on helping parents learn to care for a brain-damaged child. Also called macrocephalia, megalocephaly. Compare microcephaly. See also hydrocephalus. macrocephalic, macrocephalous, adj., macrocephalus, n.

macrocephaly

An abnormally large head and/or brain; in children, macrocephaly is defined as an occipitofrontal circumference of > 3 SD ≥ the mean.

DiffDx—non-hydrocephalic causes of macrocephaly
Benign familial form (siblings also have large heads), achondroplasia, Banayan syndrome, cerebral gigantism (with macrosomia or Sotos syndrome), cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, fragile X syndrome, Klippel-Trenauny-Weber syndrome, mucopolysaccharidosis, neurofibromatosis, Weaver syndrome.

macrocephaly

↑ head circumference, megalocephaly Pediatrics An abnormally big head/brain; in children, macrocephaly is defined as an occipitofrontal circumference of > 3 SD ≥ the mean; in adults, macrocephaly is any brain weighing > 1800 g, due to expansion of any subdural component–eg, cerebral tissue, liquid, blood, tumor or storage disease DiffDx–non-hydrocephalic causes Benign familial form–sibs also have large heads, achondroplasia, Banayan syndrome, cerebral gigantism–with macrosomia or Sotos syndrome, cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, fragile X syndrome, Klippel-Trenauny-Weber syndrome, mucopolysaccharidosis, neurofibromatosis, Weaver syndrome

meg·a·ceph·a·ly

(meg'ă-sef'ă-lē)
A condition, either congenital or acquired, in which the head is abnormally large; usually applied to an adult cranium with a capacity of over 1450 mL.
Synonym(s): macrocephaly, macrocephalia, megalocephaly, megalocephalia.
[mega- + G. kephalē, head]

macrocephaly

abnormal enlargement of the cranium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Macrocephaly is a common finding in MPS, often associated with metopic beaking and a scaphocephalic configuration.
15) Boden et al (8) found an increased risk for gestational diabetes and macrocephaly with clozapine (11 exposures).
The autistic population, schizophrenic and the nair population have the Neanderthal anthropometric phenotype with slanting forehead, large face, stubby nose, prominent mandibles, low 2D:4D ratio, large coarse trunk, macrocephaly and longer second toe as compared to big toe.
The lack of a family history of PHTS and the absence of characteristic CS findings (such as macrocephaly or any of the mucocutaneous lesions described above) makes this diagnosis unlikely in our patient.
Except for the macrocephaly, no gross external anomaly was detected.
The Proteus syndrome: partial gingantism of the hands and/or feet, nevi, hemihypertrophy, subcutaneous tumours, macrocephaly or other skull anomalies and possible growth and visceral affections.
They associated lower numbers of DUF1220 with microcephaly, when the brain is too small and larger amounts with macrocephaly, when the brain is abnormally large.
Facial abnormalities incude macrocephaly, broad facies, frontal and biparietal bossing, mild mandibular prognathism, odontogenic keratocysts ofjaws, misshapen and/or carious teeth, cleft lip and palate, ectopic calcification of falx cerebri.
This structural feature seems to vary with age, (19,22) although this trait is not unique of autism because other pathological conditions such as schizophrenia, (23) Sotos syndrome, fragile X syndrome and Cole-Hughes macrocephaly syndrome (24) also present abnormal head size and anomalies in specific brain areas involving limbic system and the cerebellum.
The patient also exhibited the following physical findings: relative macrocephaly, a flat face with sparse eyebrows and long eyelashes, dysplastic ears with a preauricular skin tag on his left ear, anteverted nostrils, a long philtrum and thin upper and lower lips (Figure la).
Macrocephaly was noted in 20% of boys and 27% of girls with autism spectrum disorders and in 19% of boys and 24% of girls who were unaffected co-twins.
The findings included a mild macrocephaly, progressively restricted range of movement in all joints, lack of body weight gain (approx.