macroamylase

macroamylase

 [mak″ro-am´ĭ-lās]
a complex in which normal serum amylase is bound to a variety of specific binding proteins, forming a complex too large for renal excretion. It is not correlated with any specific disease state; however, in hyperamylasemia or pancreatitis, it can result in urinary amylase levels not rising concomitantly with serum levels.

mac·ro·am·y·lase

(mak'rō-am'i-lās),
Descriptive term applied to a form of serum amylase in which the enzyme is present as a complex joined to a globulin; the molecular weight of the enzyme itself is 50,000, whereas that of the complex probably exceeds 160,000; hence, renal excretion of the complex is not appreciable.

macroamylase

/mac·ro·am·y·lase/ (-am´ĭ-lās) a complex in which normal serum amylase is bound to a variety of specific binding proteins, forming a complex too large for renal excretion.

macroamylase

[-am′ilās]
a form of serum amylase in which the enzyme is bound to a globulin. Because the resulting complex is too large for renal clearance, plasma amylase levels are increased. The elevated amylase level may not be harmful but may be diagnostic of other disorders, such as pancreatitis or biliary tract disease.

macroamylase

A high-molecular-weight (200-kD) plasma amylase, usually of salivary type, that circulates complexed to various large plasma proteins, such as IgG, IgA, polysaccharides, glycoproteins and alpha1-antitrypsin.

mac·ro·am·y·lase

(mak'rō-am'i-lās)
A form of serum amylase in which the enzyme is joined to a globulin.

macroamylase

a complex in which normal serum amylase is bound to a variety of specific binding proteins, forming a complex too large for renal excretion. It is not correlated with any specific disease state; however, in hyperamylasemia or pancreatitis, it can result in urinary amylase levels not rising concomitantly with serum levels.
References in periodicals archive ?
Macroamylase is a complex of amylase and serum immunoglobulins that render the particles too large to be filtered by the kidneys resulting in a high serum amylase level.
Macroamylase, macro creatine kinase, and other macroenzymes.
Circulating immunoglobulins complexed with enzymes and other proteins that are measured in the diagnostic laboratory have been recognized for many years, back at least to the recognition of macroamylase (10).
University of Virginia Case Conference: macroamylase, macro creatine kinase and other macroenzymes.
The diagnosis of macrolipasemia was not pursued because <2% of the activity in the supernatant was lost (decreasing from 15 268 to 14 960 U/L) after precipitation with polyethylene glycol as described for macroamylase screening [4].