macroaggregate


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macroaggregate

A visible aggregrate of macrobiomolecules.
References in periodicals archive ?
The wet sieving method used was designed to break up all macroaggregates into microaggregates (53-250 [micro]m) while minimising disruption of the released microaggregates.
Selective inhibition of platelet macroaggregate formation by a recombinant heparin-binding domain of human thrombospondin.
Effect of time and air-drying on macroaggregate >2 mm stability (Expt 3)
Clay mineralogy determines the importance of biological versus abiotic processes for macroaggregate formation and stabilization.
Six J, Elliot ET, Paustian K (2000) Soil macroaggregate turnover and microaggregate formation: a mechanism for C sequestration under no-tillage agriculture.
Denef K, Six J (2005) Clay mineralogy determines the importance of biological versus abiotic processes for macroaggregate formation and stabilization.
Macroaggregate stability was determined on 1- to 2-mm sieved, partially air-dried soil aggregates by a turbidimetric method (Williams et al.
Six J, Elliott ET, Paustian K (2000) Soil macroaggregate turnover and microaggregate formation: a mechanism for C sequestration under no-tillage agriculture.
Sparling GP, Hart PBS, August JA, Leslie DM (1994) A comparison of soil and microbial carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus contents, and macroaggregate stability of a soil under native forest and after clearance for pastures and plantation forest.
Macroaggregate stability was defined as the percent of water-treated aggregates of each size fraction that survived filtration through a 53-[micro]m sieve.
According to Degens (1997), macroaggregate formation could be enhanced by residue additions, which provided an energy source for microbial activity and the production of microbially derived binding agents.
However, macroaggregate C : N ratios showed significant differences only in the 10-20 cm layer (Table 5).