maceration


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maceration

 [mas″ĕ-ra´shun]
the softening of a solid by soaking. In histology, the softening of a tissue by soaking, especially in acids, until the connective tissue fibers are dissolved so that the tissue components can be teased apart. In obstetrics, the degenerative changes with discoloration and softening of tissues, and eventual disintegration, of a fetus retained in the uterus after its death.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mac·er·a·tion

(mas'ĕr-ā'shŭn),
1. Softening by the action of a liquid.
2. Softening of tissues after death by nonputrefactive (sterile) autolysis; seen especially in the stillborn, with detachment of the epidermis.
[L. macero, pp. -atus, to soften by soaking]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

maceration

Obstetrics
The sloughing of immature skin from a foetus that died in vivo and was not immediately evacuated from the uterus.
 
Wound care
Necrotic tissue that has been moist for a prolonged period and undergone deterioration.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

maceration

Obstetrics The sloughing of wads of immature skin from a fetus that died in vivo and wasn't immediately evacuated from the uterus Wound care Generic nastiness of a wound or ulcer which has been wet way too long
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mac·er·a·tion

(mas'ěr-ā'shŭn)
1. Softening by the action of a liquid.
2. Softening of tissues after death by nonputrefactive (sterile) autolysis; seen especially in the stillborn, with bullous separation of the epidermis.
[L. macero, pp. -atus, to soften by soaking]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

mac·er·a·tion

(mas'ěr-ā'shŭn)
Softening by the action of a liquid.
[L. macero, pp. -atus, to soften by soaking]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
If the milling depth is more than the chasing depth, the tea will pass without maceration. Therefore, the milling depth must only be marginally less than the chasing depth.
In addition, it was found that the flowers extract (167 [micro]gGAE/mg extract) obtained using the maceration method exhibited the highest total phenolic contents.
Still the most common method of making rose is through maceration when the skins of dark-colored grapes are steeped in the juice after crushing and before fermentation.
CustoGaia[R] herbal extracts and their blends are produced through maceration in water or solvent of your choice.
There's no need for any infusion, maceration or scaling the tallest tree in the Amazonian jungle in search of some rare fruit whose zest is a must to balance this wonderous blend of booze.
Made from pinot noir grapes, the brief maceration of juice on skins gives an attractive rose colour, while the acidity and tannin cut through richness of the meat," explains David.
Made from pinot noir grapes, the brief maceration of juice on skins gives an attractive rose colour, whilst the acidity and tannin cut through richness of the meat," explains David.
Marketed as "what to drink when you're not drinking", Seedlip's rather impressive credentials include a coveted bespoke maceration, copper pot distillation and filtration process for each individual botanical and which takes six weeks.
(2) The continuous chafing, coupled with moisture trapped within the skin folds, leads to irritation and maceration, which provides an ideal environment for pathogens to thrive.