maceration


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maceration

 [mas″ĕ-ra´shun]
the softening of a solid by soaking. In histology, the softening of a tissue by soaking, especially in acids, until the connective tissue fibers are dissolved so that the tissue components can be teased apart. In obstetrics, the degenerative changes with discoloration and softening of tissues, and eventual disintegration, of a fetus retained in the uterus after its death.

mac·er·a·tion

(mas'ĕr-ā'shŭn),
1. Softening by the action of a liquid.
2. Softening of tissues after death by nonputrefactive (sterile) autolysis; seen especially in the stillborn, with detachment of the epidermis.
[L. macero, pp. -atus, to soften by soaking]

maceration

[-ā′shən]
1 the softening and breaking down of skin resulting from prolonged exposure to moisture.
2 in histology, the softening of a tissue by soaking, especially in acids, until the connective tissue fibers are dissolved so that the tissue can be teased apart.
3 in obstetrics, the degenerative changes with discoloration and softening of tissues and eventual disintegration of a fetus retained in the uterus after its death.

maceration

Obstetrics
The sloughing of immature skin from a foetus that died in vivo and was not immediately evacuated from the uterus.
 
Wound care
Necrotic tissue that has been moist for a prolonged period and undergone deterioration.

maceration

Obstetrics The sloughing of wads of immature skin from a fetus that died in vivo and wasn't immediately evacuated from the uterus Wound care Generic nastiness of a wound or ulcer which has been wet way too long

mac·er·a·tion

(mas'ěr-ā'shŭn)
1. Softening by the action of a liquid.
2. Softening of tissues after death by nonputrefactive (sterile) autolysis; seen especially in the stillborn, with bullous separation of the epidermis.
[L. macero, pp. -atus, to soften by soaking]

maceration

increase in bulk (with softening) of the stratum corneum; caused by prolonged exposure to sweat or induced by topical application of hydrolysing or caustic chemicals, in treatment of verrucae or corn

maceration (ma·s·rāˑ·shn),

n the process in which the skin is softened and broken down by extended exposure to wetness or moisture, as in a postterm infant or a dead fetus because of prolonged exposure to the amniotic fluid.

mac·er·a·tion

(mas'ěr-ā'shŭn)
Softening by the action of a liquid.
[L. macero, pp. -atus, to soften by soaking]

maceration

the softening of a solid by soaking. In histology, the softening of a tissue by soaking, especially in acids, until the connective tissue fibers are dissolved so that the tissue components can be teased apart. In obstetrics, the degenerative changes with discoloration and softening of tissues, and eventual disintegration, of a fetus retained in the uterus after its death. In herbal medicine, certain herbs may require cold water to make produce infusions or decoctions if the active ingredient is susceptible to inactivation by heat.
References in periodicals archive ?
The maceration technique in scanning electron microscopy ofcollagen fiber frameworks.
With respect to LD50 values, the aqueous extract was more toxic than the maceration extract.
To test for possible maturation-inducing substances released by the ovaries during maceration, shell valves with intact ovaries were placed upright in bowls and treated with 1-2 ml of either filtered SW or an "ovarian supernatant" that was freshly obtained by macerating the ovary from the other half of the animal in 1-2 ml of seawater, and then centrifuging the macerated tissues and fluids at 14,000 x g for 1 min to produce a cell-free supernatant.
The results indicated a better amount and quality for the genomic DNA extracted using the modified method with the previous tissue lyophilization and the addition of PVP before the maceration step.
The gin has a delicate floral bouquet, the result of the maceration of grape flowers in the grape spirit, grown in the region of Cognac.
When used as a wound dressing, Gold Dust protects the wound tissue and the surrounding periwound area from maceration and degradation.
The producer is also introducing what is claimed to be the first wine in the world to be made from the Moscatel de Alejandria grape variety using carbonic maceration.
The pathogenesis of nonspecific inflammation involves a maceration of the meatal skin (as a result of mechanical or chemical damage), allergy, or diabetes.
The Boston Shearpump is an excellent extension of our in-line sanitary mixing capabilities, providing superior wet milling, maceration and homogenizing capabilities beyond competitive in-line mixers," says Beaudette.
The time of maceration and the type of fining agent used could preserve the antioxidants.
In the manufacturing of CTC tea, it is extremely important to get the best maceration from the CTC rollers.
Its advanced mesh design also prevents damage to the wound during removal as fluid is able to pass through to the secondary dressing, reducing the chances of maceration.