lysosome


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Related to lysosome: primary lysosome

lysosome

 [li´so-sōm]
one of the minute bodies occurring in many types of cells, containing various hydrolytic enzymes and normally involved in the process of localized intracellular digestion. adj., adj lysoso´mal.

ly·so·some

(lī'sō-sōm),
A cytoplasmic membrane-bound vesicle measuring 5-8 nm (primary lysosome) and containing a wide variety of glycoprotein hydrolytic enzymes active at an acid pH; serves to digest exogenous material, such as bacteria, as well as effete organelles of the cells.
[lyso- + G. soma, body]

lysosome

/ly·so·some/ (li´so-sōm) one of the minute bodies occurring in many types of cells, containing various hydrolytic enzymes and normally involved in the process of localized intracellular digestion.lysoso´mal
secondary lysosome  one that has fused with a phagosome (or pinosome), bringing hydrolases in contact with the ingested material and resulting in digestion of the material.

lysosome

(lī′sə-sōm′)
n.
A membrane-bound organelle in the cytoplasm of most cells containing various hydrolytic enzymes that function in intracellular digestion.

ly′so·so′mal adj.

lysosome

[lī′səsōm]
Etymology: Gk, lysein + soma, body
a cytoplasmic, membrane-bound particle that contains hydrolytic enzymes that function in intracellular digestive processes. The organelles are found in most cells but are particularly prominent in leukocytes and the cells of the liver and kidney. If the hydrolytic enzymes are released into the cytoplasm, they cause self-digestion of the cell. Thus lysosomes may play an important role in certain self-destructive diseases characterized by the wasting of tissue, such as muscular dystrophy.

ly·so·some

(lī'sō-sōm)
A cytoplasmic membrane-bound vesicle measuring 5-8 nm (primary lysosome) and containing a wide variety of glycoprotein hydrolytic enzymes active at an acid pH; serves to digest exogenous material, such as bacteria, as well as effete organelles of the cells.
[lyso- + G. soma, body]

lysosome

One of the types of ORGANELLE found in cell cytoplasm. Lysosomes contain various hydrolytic enzymes capable of digesting large molecules (macromolecules), the products of which can then leave the lysosomes. Injury to lysosomes may release enzymes that can damage the cell.

lysosome

a cytoplasmic organelle of EUKARYOTE cells that contains hydrolytic enzymes and is thought to be produced by the GOLGI APPARATUS. The sac-like structure is surrounded by a single-layered membrane which is impermeable and resistant to the enzymes inside. Lysosomes can act as the digestive system of the cell. When the sac ruptures the enzymes are released into a food vacuole produced by PHAGOCYTOSIS, thus enabling the breakdown of ingested materials.

Lysosome

Membrane-enclosed compartment in cells, containing many hydrolytic enzymes; where large molecules and cellular components are broken down.
Mentioned in: Mucopolysaccharidoses

ly·so·some

(lī'sō-sōm)
A cytoplasmic membrane-bound vesicle (primary lysosome) and containing a wide variety of glycoprotein hydrolytic enzymes active at an acid pH; serves to digest exogenous material, such as bacteria.
[lyso- + G. soma, body]

lysosome

a small intracellular organelle occurring in the cytoplasm of most cells, containing various hydrolytic enzymes and normally involved in the process of localized intracellular digestion. Lysosomes are particularly prominent in certain cells such as granulocytes, in which they are the granules, and activated macrophages. They play a major role in intracellular killing of microorganisms, destruction of foreign or damaged tissues, and in embryogenesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
He helped discover lysosomes in 1955, visualizing the organelle that Christian de Duve had characterized only cytochemically.
Human MDA-MB231 cancer cells were influenced by CHQ via radiosensitizing effects through a destabilisation of lysosomes and plasma membranes (89).
Along with lysosomes, we observed loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential ([PSI][[DELTA].
present in lysosomes containing iron particulates), indicating that iron can be mobilized inside macrophages after phagocytosis (Gilmour et al.
For example, the identity of the molecules that inhibit lysosome assembly and cause proteasome inhibition has not yet been determined.
discovered that TFEB, acting as a key transcription factor of lysosome biogenesis, positively regulates lysosomal gene expression.
50) They also showed that one of the enzymes that is defective in inherited cases of Alzheimer's disease is required for effective lysosome function.
Ultrastructural examination of neurons revealed complex arrangements of whorled or stacked membranes admixed with finely granular material and homogenous lipid droplets, with costorage of diverse materials within the same lysosome.
The use of a lysosome assay for the rapid assessment of cellular stress from copper to the freshwater snail Viviparus contectus (Millet).
Autophagy is a dynamic process where aberrant intracellular organelles and macromolecules, including accumulated lipids, are sequestered into double-membrane vesicles called autophagosomes to be delivered to and fused with lysosomes, wherein they are degraded by lysosomal enzymes, and the eventual recycling of macromolecules occurs [1,2].
Instead of fusing with the lysosome and disintegrating, the pathogen survives as a whole entity inside the phagocyte.
cannot be broken down by normal lysosome enzymes, and this junk accumulates with age.