lysosome


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Related to lysosome: primary lysosome

lysosome

 [li´so-sōm]
one of the minute bodies occurring in many types of cells, containing various hydrolytic enzymes and normally involved in the process of localized intracellular digestion. adj., adj lysoso´mal.

ly·so·some

(lī'sō-sōm),
A cytoplasmic membrane-bound vesicle measuring 5-8 nm (primary lysosome) and containing a wide variety of glycoprotein hydrolytic enzymes active at an acid pH; serves to digest exogenous material, such as bacteria, as well as effete organelles of the cells.
[lyso- + G. soma, body]

lysosome

(lī′sə-sōm′)
n.
A membrane-bound organelle in the cytoplasm of most cells containing various hydrolytic enzymes that function in intracellular digestion.

ly′so·so′mal adj.

ly·so·some

(lī'sō-sōm)
A cytoplasmic membrane-bound vesicle measuring 5-8 nm (primary lysosome) and containing a wide variety of glycoprotein hydrolytic enzymes active at an acid pH; serves to digest exogenous material, such as bacteria, as well as effete organelles of the cells.
[lyso- + G. soma, body]

lysosome

One of the types of ORGANELLE found in cell cytoplasm. Lysosomes contain various hydrolytic enzymes capable of digesting large molecules (macromolecules), the products of which can then leave the lysosomes. Injury to lysosomes may release enzymes that can damage the cell.

lysosome

a cytoplasmic organelle of EUKARYOTE cells that contains hydrolytic enzymes and is thought to be produced by the GOLGI APPARATUS. The sac-like structure is surrounded by a single-layered membrane which is impermeable and resistant to the enzymes inside. Lysosomes can act as the digestive system of the cell. When the sac ruptures the enzymes are released into a food vacuole produced by PHAGOCYTOSIS, thus enabling the breakdown of ingested materials.

Lysosome

Membrane-enclosed compartment in cells, containing many hydrolytic enzymes; where large molecules and cellular components are broken down.
Mentioned in: Mucopolysaccharidoses

ly·so·some

(lī'sō-sōm)
A cytoplasmic membrane-bound vesicle (primary lysosome) and containing a wide variety of glycoprotein hydrolytic enzymes active at an acid pH; serves to digest exogenous material, such as bacteria.
[lyso- + G. soma, body]
References in periodicals archive ?
'The lipid part was necessary to be able to pass through membranes in the cell so that it could end up in phagosomes and lysosomes,' says Buter.
"It's been long known that these modifications happen in long-lived proteins, but no one has ever looked at whether these modifications could prevent the lysosomes from being able to break down the proteins," he said.
To date, it is unknown whether LRBA-deficient patients exhibit alterations in the amount of FasL in the plasmatic membrane, but the increase in serum FasL in these patients could suggest that the LRBA deficiency may have an effect on FasL, similar to CTLA-4, regulating its trafficking either towards plasmatic membrane or lysosomes (25).
Artificially clearing them by either activating lysosomes in older cells or subjecting them to starvation conditions to limit their protein production actually restored the ability of these older resting stem cells to activate.
abortus 2308 for phagosome-lysosome fusion in RAW264.7 murine macrophages, 9% of Green Fluorescence-labelled phagosomes colocalized with lysosome at 4 h post-infection.
Subsequently, lysosomes fuse with autophagosomes to generate autolysosomes, in which cellular constituents are broken down by acid hydrolases.
In conclusion, lysosome pathway, mitotic metaphase and anaphase, and signaling by Rho GTPases may be involved in the development of osteoporosis.
LC3-II levels in the presence of CQ were larger than that in the absence of CQ especially in 24 h and 48 h of diosgenin treatment, and the differences between them indicated that LC3 delivered to lysosomes for degradation (Fig.
At the end of the emersion period heart rate was assessed for each adult and a second 1 mL hemolymph sample taken for lysosome and metal analysis.
Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation pathway usually activated under low nutrient conditions which acts to sequester and deliver cytoplasmic material, including organelles, toxic metabolites, or intracellular pathogens, to the lysosome for degradation and/or recycling [2].