lysogenic


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Related to lysogenic: Lysogenic cycle

ly·so·gen·ic

(lī'sō-jen'ik),
1. Causing or having the power to cause lysis, as the action of certain antibodies and chemical substances.
2. Pertaining to bacteria in the state of lysogeny.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lysogenic

(lī′sə-jĕn′ĭk)
adj.
1. Capable of causing or undergoing lysis.
2. Of or relating to lysogeny.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ly·so·gen·ic

(lī'sō-jen'ik)
1. Causing or having the power to cause lysis, as the action of certain antibodies and chemical substances.
2. Pertaining to bacteria in the state of lysogeny.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Kluskens & Joana Azeredo, Revisiting Phage Therapy: New Applications for Old Resources, 23 TRENDS MICROBIOLOGY 185,185-86 (2015) (noting lysogenic capabilities that risk transferring new genes to bacteria).
Significance of lysogeny in the marine environment: studies with isolates and a model of lysogenic phage production.
Typically, only lytic phages are exploited for phage therapy: firstly, because they kill the host bacteria in a more efficient manner; subsequently because, after lysogenic induction, temperate phages can transfer bacteria DNA fragments to other species, and if these fragments contain gene-encoding toxins or antibiotic resistance elements, they could generate new dangerous bacteria.
The mixture was conveniently diluted in M9 buffer (0.6% [Na.sub.2]HP[O.sub.4], 0.3% K[H.sub.2]P[O.sub.4], 1% N[H.sub.4]Cl, and 0.05% NaCl) and 0.1 mL of the lysogenic culture [WP2s([lambda])] was added to 0.3 mL of the indicator strain (RJF013).
Among the topics are bacteriophage biology and diversity, applying them to control pathogens in food animal production, potential use as indicators of water quality and wastewater treatment processes, the lysogenic conversion in bacteria of importance to the food industry, controlling infectious diseases in aquaculture, and coverage and safety issues controlling bacterial diarrhea with phages.
This gene is known to be transmitted by a mobile lysogenic phage, phiSLT.
On page 6 [19], the text refers to "viruses that can integrate into the genome of the host, such as retroviruses and lysogenic bacteriophages*," two groups that are not closely related to the Polyomaviridae.
Each time the bacterial cell containing the prophage (known as a lysogenic cell) undergoes binary fission, the phage DNA is replicated and passed on to each daughter cell along with the bacterial DNA.
A repressor protein of bacteriophage P1, encoded by the c1 gene, is responsible for maintaining P1 prophage in the lysogenic state.
Consider the lambda phage, which exists in its bacterial host (Escherichia coli) as either an inactive lysogenic form or as an active lytic form.
Though virulence is attributed to lysogenic conversion by certain bacteriophage, not all studies have found a prevalence of these exotoxin-producing organisms in streptococcal toxic shock.