lysis-centrifugation

lysis-centrifugation

A technique for detecting microorganisms in a specimen of body fluid, in which the cells in the fluid are mixed in a tube, and then allowed to stand (usually for an hour) to allow its cellular components to break down. After cellular breakdown (“lysis”) the tube is centrifuged to concentrate its sediment. The sediment is subsequently spread on culture media.

Lysis-centrifugation is used to detect bacteria, fungi, mycobacteria, and other microorganisms in blood or body fluids.

References in periodicals archive ?
[1] A commercial lysis-centrifugation blood culture system has become available for routine use.
[5] Organisms isolated by this lysis-centrifugation method were also identified to the species level and antibiotic susceptibility tests were put up.
By the lysis-Centrifugation method, the most common pathogen isolated was Pseudomonas aeruginosa 21/60 (35.00%) followed by MSSA 09/60 (15.00%) and Escherichia coli 08/60 (13.33%).The overall differences in the rate of isolation of organisms by these two methods was found to be statistically highly significant (P= 0.000) [Table 3]
Overall the mean time required for growth of all the organisms was much less by the lysis-centrifugation method.
In very low birth weight neonates, however, the detection of fungal BSIs using DNA technology is not superior to fungal lysis-centrifugation isolator system (19).
Detection of fungal DNA in lysis-centrifugation blood culture for the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis in neonatal patients.
Lack of utility of the lysis-centrifugation blood culture method for detection of fungemia in immunocompromised cancer patients.
3) The use of automated, continuous monitoring blood culture systems for patients with suspected brucellosis should be preferred over the lysis-centrifugation method because the latter involves centrifuging clinical specimens and visually inspecting plates to detect the organism and probably increases the risk for transmission (11,27).
(1) Detection of yeast fungemia by blood culture often requires 2 or 3 days of incubation, even with the use of automated continuous-monitoring blood culture systems (2) or lysis-centrifugation. (3,4) Molecular methods for the rapid diagnosis of fungemia are under development, but are not yet widely used in clinical laboratories.
Comparison of the lysis-centrifugation and agitated biphasic blood culture systems for detection of fungemia.
Lysis-centrifugation blood cultures in the detection of tissue-proven invasive candidiasis: disseminated versus single-organ infection.
Clinical evaluation of the lysis-centrifugation blood culture system for the detection of fungemia and comparison with a conventional biphasic broth blood culture system.