lysin


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lysin

 [li´sin]
1. an antibody that causes complement-dependent lysis of cells; often used with a prefix indicating the target cells, as hemolysin or bacteriolysin.
2. any substance that causes cell lysis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ly·sin

(lī'sin),
1. A specific complement-fixing antibody that acts destructively on cells and tissues; the various types are designated in accordance with the form of antigen that stimulates the production of the lysin, for example, hemolysin, bacteriolysin.
2. Any substance that causes lysis.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lysin

(lī′sĭn)
n.
1. A substance that is capable of causing lysis.
2. An antibody that acts in conjunction with complement to cause lysis of cells.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lysin

As a stand-alone word, a nonspecific term for:
(1) An antibody, especially a complement-fixing antibody; 
(2) Any substance capable of lysing something.

As a root (-lysin), the lysing of that with which it is partnered, as in:
(1) Bacteriolysin;
(2) Gametolysin; 
(3) Haemolysin, etc.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ly·sin

(lī'sin)
1. A complement-fixing antibody that acts destructively on cells and tissues; the various types are designated in accordance with the form of antigen that stimulates the production of the lysin, e.g., hemolysin, bacteriolysin.
2. Any substance that causes lysis.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lysin

Any substance capable of causing LYSIS, especially a specific antibody that brings about a COMPLEMENT FIXATION reaction.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

lysin

a type of ANTIBODY.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

ly·sin

(lī'sin)
1. A complement-fixing antibody that acts destructively on cells and tissues; the various types are designated in accordance with the form of antigen that stimulates the production of the lysin, e.g., hemolysin, bacteriolysin.
2. Any substance that causes lysis.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In June 2019, the Company presented five posters at ASM Microbe 2019, including 'PK-PD Relationship and PK Driver of Efficacy of the Novel Antibacterial Lysin Exebacase (CF-301) in Pre-Clinical Models', which was selected for an Outstanding Abstract Award sponsored by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) and determined by the ASM Microbe Program Committee.
Buchanan, "Using a bacteriocin structure to engineer a phage lysin that targets Yersinia pestis," Biochemical Society Transactions, vol.
The sperm acrosomal protein lysin was identified as significant in mediating this species-specific fertilization (Lewis et al., 1982).
Use of a bacteriophage lysin, PlyC, as an enzyme disinfectant against Streptococcus equi.
"NK lysin is produced by host lymphocytes that are activated by parasites during coccidiosis infection in the gut." Lillehoj says.
More recently, PlyG lysin, purified from phage-[gamma] (specific to B.
A few drops of the enzyme, called lysin, can promptly destroy a test tube worth of anthrax.
The PlyG lysin has treatment value, too, the investigators said.
The enzyme, called lysin, prevented the death of most mice that the researchers had infected with a bacterial relative of B.
Balanceforsog med forskellige forhold mellem treonin og lysin. Beretning fra Statens Husdyrbrugsforsog #639.
M2 PHARMA-January 16, 2019-Bioharmony Therapeutics, Boehringer Ingelheim Team to Advance Bacteriophage Lysin Therapeutics for the Treatment of Multi-Drug Resistant Bacterial Infections
Thus, according to the content of such non-replaceable amino acids as lysin and leucine, the red deer meat exceeds beef, pork and lamb (Kaimbaeva and Gurinovich, 2016).