lysigenous


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lysigenous

(of tissues) producing cavities by the breakdown of cells, as in the secretory organs of some plants.
References in periodicals archive ?
Air spaces in culms (Figures 2(b) and 2(c)) and stolons (Figures 2(e) and 2(f)) consist of pith cavities and schizolysigeny to lysigenous aerenchyma in the cortex and central cylinder interior to the SCR.
Leaf sheaths and blades of wild rice have thick cuticles on adaxial and abaxial surfaces (Figures 2(i) and 2(j)), sclerenchyma bundles at both ends of bundle sheath extensions, or ribs and girders, just under epidermis, and schizolysigenous to lysigenous cavities or aerenchyma in leaf sheaths and leaf blades (Figures 2(i) and 2(j)).
The midcortex is lysigenous aerenchyma and is bordered by enlarged cells peripherally; the outer cortex is a biseriate hypodermis with uniseriate sclerenchyma layer (SC) and uniseriate exodermis [9], like Z.
These lysigenous holes in the lateral roots would probably deteriorate further under continued anaerobic conditions to the complete disintegration of the cortex, as was evident in the primary roots.
Although numerous lysigenous glands have been described in the last 140 years, most of these descriptions have been countered by other studies reporting schizogeny in same or related species (Tschirch & Stock, 1933; Cart & Carr, 1970; Thomson et al., 1976).
This swelling caused the schizogenous secretory cavities of lemon to appear lysigenous. Epithelial cells showed similar damaging swelling when dissected and exposed to water, causing even unfixed freehand sections of secretory cavities to falsely resemble lysigenous glands.
Since anatomical studies and theories of the 19th century have had a strong influence on the lysigenous gland concept as it is now widely believed, I will present a short summary of its history in order to help evaluate its validity.
Induction of enzymes associated with lysigenous aerenchyma formation in roots of Zea mays during hypoxia or nitrogen starvation.
Represented were 30 species of Gossypium comprising A, B, C, D, F, G, K, and AD genomic groups, and Thespesia thespesioides (Table 1), a genus in the Gossypieae tribe which, like Gossypium, has lysigenous foliar glands.
The high concentration of TAs was probably related to the exceptionally large lysigenous glands in the leaves of these species.
One possibility is that following lysigenous aerenchyma formation in wheat roots, some degree of root function is lost even though the capacity to precipitate ions is retained (just as minerals will precipitate around a pipe connected with a more highly oxygenated area).
Ethylene could be involved in lysigenous aerenchyma development in wheat roots so that high ethylene concentration triggered increased cellulase activity associated with aerenchyma formation, as demonstrated for stems of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) (Kawase, 1981) and roots of maize (He et al., 1994).