lyotropic


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to lyotropic: Lyotropic Series

lyophilic

 [li″o-fil´ik]
having an affinity for, or stable in, solution.

ly·o·phil·ic

(lī'ō-fil'ik),
1. In colloid chemistry, denoting a dispersed phase having a pronounced affinity for the dispersion medium; when the dispersed phase is lyophilic, the colloid is usually a reversible one.
2. Denoting a preference for the solvent.
Synonym(s): lyotropic
[lyo- + G. phileō, to love]

ly·o·phil·ic

(lī'ō-fil'ik)
colloid chemistry Denoting a dispersed phase having a pronounced affinity for the dispersion medium; when the dispersed phase is lyophilic, the colloid is usually a reversible one.
Synonym(s): lyotropic.
[lyo- + G. phileō, to love]
References in periodicals archive ?
Kiss and Porter [16] reported the experimental evidence of negative first normal stress difference of lyotropic LCPs for the first time.
Evans, "Formation of highly ordered mesoporous silica materials adopting lyotropic liquid crystal mesophases," Journal of Materials Chemistry, vol.
Lekkerkerker; Phase transitions in lyotropic colloidal and polymer liquid crystal, Report on Progress Physics: 55 (8), 1241-1328 (1992)
Besides the methods mentioned above, the templating synthesis using lyotropic liquid crystals (LLC), common biomimetic systems, is useful in fabricating nanomaterials (Zhao et al., 2003).
This can lead to various superstructures such as micelles, vesicles, multilayers, and lyotropic liquid crystalline phases (at high concentrations) (317).
To create a breathable barrier, Gin and his colleagues turned to a lyotropic liquid crystal, which has two different ends: one water loving, the other water repelling.
They begin by describing liquid crystal materials, including thermotropic liquid crystalline materials, lyotropic liquid crystals, and amphotropic liquid crystals.
It is interesting that Geary et al claim that the cationic polymer can promote the formation of a microscopic-phase separation of lyotropic liquid crystals.
This study focuses on the synthesis of homopolymer and copolymer hydrogels via the photopolymerization of water-soluble and oil-soluble monomers in Pluronic Lyotropic Liquid Crystals (LLCs).
Calcium and Mg were the dominant resident exchangeable cations in both soils, and based on the lyotropic series, these divalent cations have a greater affinity for the exchange sites relative to monovalent cations such as N[H.sub.4]-N, particularly where organic matter is a major source of the negative surface charge (Table 2).
We have shown that the reverse transition: isotropic to liquid crystalline may also happen in special conditions, and one of the examples is on a polymer that has no known thermotropic or lyotropic behaviour.