Lynch

(redirected from lyncher)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Lynch

(linch),
Henry T., 20th-century U.S. oncologist. See: Lynch syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lyncher era una persona cercana a la familia, dado que una prima de Joana trabajaba para el como nana.
If one wants to prevent the stoning, rather than trigger it, it makes sense to focus the attention of the potential lynchers on that last obstacle in the path of contagious lynching.
The tree's witness is here aligned with white identity in taking on the guilt of the lyncher.
The Cress-Color Confrontation theory goes on to explain why it was necessary to lynch and castrate so many Black males because the lynchers subconsciously or consciously understood that melanin expands from the penis.
Some read, "Your hands are full of blood," "Thou Shalt Not Kill," "Mothers, do lynchers go to heaven?
His early novel The Lynchers begins with a collage of quotations, records, and eyewitness accounts; Philadelphia Fire centers on the move bombing of 1985; The Cattle Killing ranges from plague-ridden Philadelphia in 1793 to the Xhosa homelands in South Africa.
As a society we will continue to fight all avengers and lynchers, as we did in this case.
In "Pantaloon in Black," Rider's body is put to use by the lynchers as a warning to the black community.
body as he stands among his lynchers "taller and calm like
When the exhibition first opened in New York City in 2000, the historian Grace Elizabeth Hale reviewed it for the Journal of American History, suggesting that "viewers [are] left with an exhibit that is too close to the spectacle created by the lynchers themselves" and demanding that curators contex-tualize these images with writings by African American authors that resisted the images' associations of blackness with victimization (993).
In the same discussion, he remarks as well that "patriotism, nationalism, even bigotry and repression were all clothed in the rhetoric of liberty," a point with significance for contemporary historians of anti-abolitionist mobs, lynchers, and rightwing populist forms such as the neoliberal Tea Party.