Lynch

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Lynch

(linch),
Henry T., 20th-century U.S. oncologist. See: Lynch syndrome.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Ames's organization, The Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching (ASWPL), used the strategy of refusing lynchers the use of women as an excuse and thus ignore the racism that motivated brutal attacks on African Americans.
If one wants to prevent the stoning, rather than trigger it, it makes sense to focus the attention of the potential lynchers on that last obstacle in the path of contagious lynching.
The descriptions by narrator Gavin Stevens and the actions of lyncher Percy Grimm frame Christmas's death as social sacrifice: in the rituals of Stevens's narrative and Grimm's sacrificial violence, Christmas becomes transformed as though he had been "cooked," his identity defined and his story prepared into a more readily consumable object--as fully as raw timber fed through a planing mill.
The lynching tree withered, the near-by town stagnated, and the lyncher suffered a prolonged death.
The lyncher in me; a search for redemption in the face of history.
And of none of this boast, gorging on sow or tripping along cliffs whistling some lyncher's saw.
While Gunnar achieves good standing by allowing himself to be refashioned as a spectacular object for collective consumption, acceding to that exchange forces him to surrender the prospect of agency and enter the lyncher's noose.
But the task of equal-justice advocates has not become easier simply because neither slavery's chains, nor the lyncher's rope, nor humiliating Jim Crow signs are any longer the main means of holding black people in a subordinated status.
(8.) Furthermore, the handful of photographs in which whites and blacks appear together depicts the stern faces of the sharecropper boss, governmental authority or lyncher.
Here the listener takes on the rider of the lyncher, the burden of the oak; he, too, shares in the "curse," becoming a substitute body in bearing such a load.
[the `rape'] really happen?" McLendon, the head lyncher, answers, "Happen?