Lynch

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Lynch

(linch),
Henry T., 20th-century U.S. oncologist. See: Lynch syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even more provocative perhaps on Dunbar's part is the exposure of the lynchers as figures of authority and responsibility within the white community, as "the judge," "the doctor," and "the minister" (who, in bringing along "his oldest son," completes the image of the masked riders as the four horsemen of the apocalypse).
Darling, drew on the public record of the case, as well as "families of the area," and included reference to local tradition which held that "the tree on which Price was hung died a short time later and that all the known lynchers died some sort of hideous death such as drowning, fire and suicide.
Wells was among the first to argue that the lynching of African-Americans was unrelated to the crimes of which they had been accused, turning attention toward lynchers as racist perpetrators who used false accusations of sexual assault to justify terrorizing African-Americans who threatened white privilege and dominance.
80) The commentator in al-Shaab was arguing in other words that Romey had been the victim of racial misidentification, and that his lynchers had not understood what he believed to be true: that Syrians were fully white.
After shooting him repeatedly, the lynchers dragged his body to the site of the alleged crime where, before some 10,000 spectators, they burned his remains.
He knew the lynchers studying their lines in The History of Surrealism would never act without dressing for the part.
No one was ever prosecuted for the lynching of Frank, and the identity of the lynchers remained a closely-guarded secret, first by the lynchers themselves and then by their descendants.
Wiegman (1993a) explains how this castration forced a gender difference on top of the racial difference between the lynchers and their black male victims:
Public lynching, once so common to our shame in the United States, has all but disappeared, but the vitriol that brought enjoyment to lynchers sadly still exists.
And back then, the lynchers of black boys and men were as likely to be celebrated as heroic defenders of all that is good and pure as they were to be arrested and charged with murder.
Grandiosely, Chavis likened his sacking to a "lynching," a metaphor slightly out of whack unless the NAACP board members who voted him out are the moral equals of Ku Klux Klan lynchers.
Hentoff quotes Russell Baker's description of Huckleberry Finn's moral: "The people |Huck and Jim~ encounter are drunkards, murderers, bullies, swindlers, lynchers, thieves, liars, frauds, child abusers, numb-skulls, hypocrites, windbags and traders in human flesh.