Lynch

(redirected from lynched)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Lynch

(linch),
Henry T., 20th-century U.S. oncologist. See: Lynch syndrome.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Since their focus is on the Southern lynching of African Americans, they also do not seem to notice the thousands of people of Mexican descent, Native Americans, and others who were lynched, many of whom were classed as "white" in the census statistics.
"Lynched" preserves memory even while it provides an analysis of the meaning of those memories.
In the antebellum period, the majority of persons lynched were white, not so much because blacks escaped condemnation for alleged criminal activity, but because lynching them would have involved destruction of slave property--something planters were unlikely to condone.
Indeed, as late as 1885, the number of whites lynched annually almost always exceeded the number of blacks.
Blacks were lynched for failing to step aside on a sidewalk, or accidentally brushing against a white woman.
Most lynching victims were black men, but black women and non-blacks were also lynched across the country in this final, brutal act of power.
Most often whites lynched blacks, frequently in public spectacles of extreme vengeance and brutality.
In both, whites were sometimes lynched and blacks were occasionally lynchers, but despite such anomalies, Brundage rightly concludes, between 1880 and 1930 lynching served primarily as a means of racial control.