lymphocele

(redirected from lymphocyst)

lym·pho·cele

(lim'fō-sēl),
A cystic mass that contains lymph, usually from diseased or injured lymphatic channels.
Synonym(s): lymphocyst
[lympho- + G. kēlē, tumor]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lymphocele

(lĭm′fō-sēl) [L. lympha, lymph, + Gr. kele, tumor, swelling]
A cyst that contains lymph.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, perioperative morbidities occurred in 56 cases (51.4%) that consisted of fever (19), urinary tract infection (2), infected wound (28), lymphocyst (5), lymphedema (5), and left hemiparalysis with myocardial ischemia (1).
However, about two-thirds of patients that underwent inguinofemoral lymphadenectomy were associated with high rates of postoperative complications especially lymphedema and lymphocyst. Therefore, sentinel lymph node biopsy was recently proposed in early stage patients with clinically negative groin nodes to reduce these complications [19].
Over 80% do not benefit from a pelvic lymphadenectomy, but may suffer from adverse complications such as lymphoedema, lymphocyst formation, neurovascular and ureteral injury, or secondary blood loss.
Additionally, lymphadenectomy increases the risk of postoperative fever, incision site infection, lymphocyst formation, lower-extremity edema, embolic events, gastrointestinal obstruction, and perioperative mortality [6].
But lymphadenectomy is time-consuming, requires a specialized gynecologic surgeon, and is associated with some increase in the risk of morbidity--namely, lymphedema, lymphocyst formation, deep-vein thrombosis (DVT), and blood loss.
Wound infection and breakdown were the most common complications, occur ring in 18% of the total population, followed by lymphedema in 9% and lymphocyst in 6%.
Lecuru, "Postoperative lymphocysts after lymphadenectomy for gynaecological malignancies: preventive techniques and prospects," European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, vol.
Perioperative morbidity parameters (e.g., duration of surgery, estimated blood loss, and organ injury) and postoperative complications (e.g., infections, thromboembolism, lymphocysts, and lymphoedema) were also compared between the two groups.
In addition-t-o the hysterectomy, there were four postoperative complications: one necrosis of the right uterine cornua, one ureterovaginal fistula, and two lymphocysts.
71 symptomatic lymphocysts were observed and mostly managed by radiological drainage; 15% required surgery.