lymph


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Related to lymph: lymphoma, Lymph cancer

lymph

 [limf]
a transparent, usually slightly yellow, often opalescent liquid found within the lymphatic vessels, and collected from tissues in all parts of the body and returned to the blood via the lymphatic system. It is about 95 per cent water; the remainder consists of plasma proteins and other chemical substances contained in the blood plasma, but in slightly smaller percentage than in plasma. Its cellular component consists chiefly of lymphocytes.

The body contains three main kinds of fluid: blood, tissue fluid, and lymph. The blood consists of the blood cells and platelets, the plasma, or fluid portion, and a variety of chemical substances dissolved in the plasma. When the plasma, without its solid particles and some of its dissolved substances, seeps through the capillary walls and circulates among the body tissues, it is known as tissue fluid. When this fluid is drained from the tissues and collected by the lymphatic system, it is called lymph. The lymphatic system eventually returns the lymph to the blood, where it again becomes plasma. This movement of fluid through the body is described under circulatory system.
lymph node any of the accumulations of lymphoid tissue organized as definite lymphoid organs along the course of lymphatic vessels (see accompanying illustration); they consist of an outer cortical and an inner medullary part. Lymph nodes are the main source of lymphocytes of the peripheral blood and, as part of the reticuloendothelial system, serve as a defense mechanism by removing noxious agents such as bacteria and toxins, and probably play a role in antibody formation. Sometimes called, incorrectly, lymph gland. Called also lymph or lymphatic follicle and lymphatic nodule.
Location of clusters of superficial lymph nodes. From Applegate, 2000.

lymph

(limf), [TA]
A clear, transparent, sometimes faintly yellow and slightly opalescent fluid that is collected from the tissues throughout the body, flows in the lymphatic vessels (through the lymph nodes), and is eventually added to the venous blood circulation. Lymph consists of a clear liquid portion, varying numbers of white blood cells (chiefly lymphocytes), and a few red blood cells.
Synonym(s): lympha [TA]
[L. lympha, clear spring water]

lymph

(lĭmf)
n.
1. A clear, watery, sometimes faintly yellowish fluid derived from body tissues that contains white blood cells and circulates throughout the lymphatic system, returning to the venous bloodstream through the thoracic duct. Lymph acts to remove bacteria and certain proteins from the tissues, transport fat from the small intestine, and supply mature lymphocytes to the blood.
2. Archaic A spring or stream of pure, clear water.

lymph

(limf) [TA]
A clear, sometimes faintly yellow and slightly opalescent fluid that is collected from the tissues throughout the body, flows in the lymphatic vessels, and through the lymph nodes, and is eventually added to the venous blood circulation. Lymph consists of a clear liquid portion, varying numbers of white blood cells (chiefly lymphocytes), and a few red blood cells.

lymph

Tissue fluids drained by the lymph vessels and returned to the large veins. Lymph varies in character in different parts of the body. Lymph from the tissues contains large numbers of white cells, mainly LYMPHOCYTES, and is usually clear. Lymph from the intestines is milky, especially after a meal, because of the large number of fat globules which it contains. Fat-laden lymph is called CHYLE.

lymph

the INTERSTITIAL FLUID found in the LYMPHATIC SYSTEM and around the tissues of vertebrates, with a total volume of around 20 litres in an adult human. Although its composition varies with location in the body, lymph is typically a clear, transparent fluid (95% water) which, like blood, will clot when removed from lymph vessels since it contains similar clotting agents to blood (except platelets). Lymph also contains protein, glucose and salts with large numbers of LEUCOCYTES, mainly LYMPHOCYTES.

Lymph

The almost colourless fluid that bathes body tissues and is found in the lymphatic vessels that drain the tissues of the fluid that filters across the blood vessel walls from blood. Lymph carries antibodies and lymphocytes (white blood cells that help fight infection) that have entered the lymph nodes from the blood.

lymph

(limf) [TA]
A clear, sometimes faintly yellow, and slightly opalescent fluid collected from tissues throughout the body, flows in the lymphatic vessels, and through the lymph nodes, and is eventually added to the venous blood circulation.

Patient discussion about lymph

Q. tender protuding lymph node lump rt. arm pit aprox. 1/2" dia. any concerns or recommend treatment necessary?

A. lymph nodes can flare up any time you get infected in the armpit and all the area that it drains. i had it several times and it went away in the same manner that it came. i think that sometimes it caused because of a blockade done by deodorant. so i try to use this Chinese salt stone that doesn't contain aluminum.

More discussions about lymph
References in periodicals archive ?
Approximately 10 to 40 percent of breast cancer patients who have had an axillary lymph node dissection will experience lymphedema, according to Dr.
Specimens Submitted.--This section provides a listing of all lymph node groups and the associated nonlymphoid tissue received as part of a single surgery, and should correlate with the operative procedure designation (noncore item, see below).
Also, axillary lymphadenectomy results in significant morbidity like chronic lymph oedema of ipsilateral extremity (3-12%), frozen shoulder syndrome and long-term sensory abnormalities.
* The procedure of hydrodissection with saline to separate target small lymph node metastases from adjacent cervical large vessels can be safely performed under US guidance with excellent (100%) separation success rate (SSR).
Postoperative prophylactic radiotherapy for esophageal cancer cannot elevate the survival rate, but inhibit lymph node metastasis and raise the local control rate.8 In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 1034 patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), aiming to clarify the clinical and pathological factors affecting lymph node metastasis, and to provide valuable clinical evidence for designing the radiotherapy target volume.
Synchronous metastasis to the left external iliac or inguinal lymph nodes without local recurrence and hematogenous metastasis is very rare for rectal cancer.
Among all the factors that determine the prognosis of carcinoma breast, metastatic involvement of the axillary lymph nodes remains the most important2.
Qualified-close clinical follow-up and the determination of high/low risk factors for malignancy can prevent unnecessary investigation in the diagnosis of enlarged lymph nodes.
Start from the top of your ankle down toward your toes, gently "moving" the lymph down toward the toes and then inward toward the space between your big toe and second toe (which is a major lymph exit),
The researchers found in the base-case scenario that routine lymphadenectomy had a cost of $18,041 and an effectiveness of 2.79 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) versus $17,036 and 2.81 QALYs with selective lymphadenectomy and $16,401 and 2.87 QALYS with sentinel lymph node mapping.
Infection: An infection in the body can lead to an increase in white blood cells concentration and cause swelling in lymph nodes of the neck.
Lymph, aside from carrying waste, also contains white blood cells that are known to protect the body from infection and disease.