luxation


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to luxation: Lens luxation

dislocation

 [dis″lo-ka´shun]
displacement of a bone from a joint; called also luxation. The most common ones involve a finger, thumb, shoulder, or hip; less common are those of the mandible, elbow, or knee. Symptoms include loss of motion, temporary paralysis of the joint, pain, swelling, and sometimes shock. Dislocations are usually caused by a blow or fall, although unusual physical effort may also cause one. A few dislocations, especially of the hip, are congenital, usually from a faulty construction of the joint, and are best treated in infancy with a cast and possibly surgery.

A dislocation should be treated as a fracture when first aid is administered. First aid includes checking for a pulse distal to the location and keeping the patient as still as possible. The patient is moved as a whole unit on a long board or a stretcher. As soon as possible the dislocation must be reduced by a surgeon.
Shoulder dislocation.
complete dislocation one in which the surfaces are entirely separated.
compound dislocation one in which the joint communicates with the outside air through a wound.
congenital dislocation of the hip a former name for developmental dysplasia of the hip.
pathologic dislocation one due to disease of the joint or to paralysis of the muscles.
simple dislocation one in which there is no communication with the air through a wound.

lux·a·tion

(lŭk-sā'shŭn),
1. Synonym(s): dislocation
2. In dentistry, the dislocation or displacement of the condyle in the temporomandibular fossa, or of a tooth from the alveolus.
[L. luxatio]

luxation

Orthopedics The complete dislocation of a joint. Cf Atlantoaxial subluxation, Subluxation.

lux·a·tion

(lŭk-sā'shŭn)
1. Synonym(s): dislocations.
2. dentistry The dislocation or displacement of the condyle in the temporomandibular fossa, or of a tooth from the alveolus.
[L. luxatio]

luxation

Dislocation.

lux·a·tion

(lŭk-sā'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, dislocation or displacement of condyle in temporomandibular fossa, or of a tooth from the alveolus.
2. Synonym(s): dislocation.
[L. luxatio]
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, of the 23 dogs with luxation, 21 cases resulted from accidents, while 2 cases were of unknown cause.
Case report: Surgical luxation and elevation as treatment approach for secondary eruption failure of permanent molars.
The prevalence of luxation injuries (subluxation, intrusive luxation and lateral luxation) and tooth avulsions were significantly higher in the SG (42.2% and 10.5%, respectively) than the CG (25.0% and 4.2%, respectively) [p=0.028].There were no extrusive luxation injuries observed in SG and CG.
Characteristics Total G1--urban G2--rural N (%) N (%) N (%) Fall in the last 12 months 61 (48.8) 36 (59.01) 25 (40.99) Fell from: Chair 4 (6.55) 2 (5.55) 2 (8) Owh height 49 (80.32) 31 (86.11) 18 (72) Cause of fall: Balance disorder 24 (39.34) 27 (75) 11 (44) Uneven floors or with 10 (16.39) 32 (88.88) 19 (76) holes Slippery or wet floors 15 (24.59) 30 (83.33) 16 (64) Consequence of the fall: 14 (22.95) 29 (80.55) 4 (16) Excoriations 21 (34.42) 30 (83.33) 10 (40) Sprain and luxation
Ouakrim et al., "Luxation obturatrice de la hanche: un traumatisme rare en pratique sportive," The Pan African Medical Journal, vol.
Lens luxation - Jack Russell dogs are very prone to their lens moving within the eye, and this can cause a form of glaucoma, which is very painful.
This vet indicated she has a fair amount of luxation in the right hip.
Hip luxation, in which the femoral head is displaced from the acetabulum, is often secondary to trauma in small animals (BASHER, 1986).
The management recommended for impacted molars comprises removal of the overlying bone or the mucosa and luxation and removal of the unerupted molar (8).
Luxation of the intertarsal joint in avian patients is often due to trauma or underlying developmental abnormalities such as avulsion of the attachment site for the flexor hallucis muscle, rupture or displacement of the tibial cartilage, displacement of the gastrocnemius tendon, or rupture of the collateral ligaments and joint retinaculum [1-3].
The scientists said the additional breeds had mutations for the bleeding disorder Factor VII Deficiency; hyperuricosuria, which is elevated levels of uric acid in the urine, lens luxation, von Willebrand's disease, multifocal retinopathy, multidrug resistance and rod-cone dysplasia, a form of retinal degeneration.