luxatio erecta

lux·a·ti·o e·rec·'ta

subglenoid dislocation of the head of the humerus in which the arm is elevated and abducted and cannot be lowered.

luxatio erecta

(lŭk-sā′shē-ō ĕ-rek′tă)
Subglenoid displacement of the head of the humerus associated with disruption of the rotator cuff.
References in periodicals archive ?
LaPrade, "Bilateral luxatio erecta humeri and bilateral knee dislocations in the same patient," American Journal of Orthopedics-Belle Mead, vol.
The mechanism of injury may involve either a direct injury over acromion, superior dislocation of humeral head (6) or inferior dislocation with luxatio erecta. (7)
Inferior shoulder dislocation or luxatio erecta is the least common type of glenohumeral dislocation, comprising only about 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations.
There are a number of complications associated with luxatio erecta. Eighty percent of patients with this injury have either an associated rotator cuff tear or a fracture of the greater tuberosity (which we'll get to in a bit).
Luxatio erecta is normally treated by closed reduction using the traction-counter-traction technique.
Results of treatment of luxatio erecta (inferior shoulder dislocation).
(2.) Goldstein JR, Eltbert WE Locked anterior-inferior shoulder subluxation presenting as luxatio erecta. J Emerg Med.
The aim of this article was to give an opinion regarding the conservative treatment of luxatio erecta humeri.
After his X-ray and computed tomography imaging, the diagnosis of luxatio erecta humeri (Figure 2) and complex posterior hip dislocation (Figure 3) was established.
Inferior shoulder dislocation, known as luxatio erecta humeri, was first defined by Middeldorph and Scharm in 1859 [4].
reviewed 57 articles associated with the injury mechanism of all cases of luxatio erecta humeri, based on PubMed database.
Nevertheless, we encountered no cases of luxatio erecta humeri and concurrent hip dislocation.