lute

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Related to lutenist: lutist, Lutestring

lute

 [lo̳t]
1. a substance such as cement, wax, or clay that coats a joint area to make a tight seal; called also luting agent.
2. to coat with such a substance.

lute

(lūt),
To seal or fasten with wax or cement.
[L. lutum, mud]

lute

(lūt)
To seal or fasten with wax or cement.
[L. lutum, mud]
References in periodicals archive ?
M usical settings of his poetry by contemporary composers suggest that he often used music that was already about, singing his poems to the bass patterns, dances, and popular tunes that were the lutenist's stock-in-trade.
Albert de Mirimonde asserts that because of precisely this type of lewd insinuation, we seldom see Saint Cecilia depicted as a lutenist in sixteenth-and seventeenth-century art.
While Spring's study of the "Golden Age" of British lute music is thorough and exemplary--including some very useful lists of printed books, manuscripts, and comparisons of contents--his discussion of the period from 1625 to the end of the century explores relatively lesser known composers and will be of interest to lutenists wishing to explore new repertory.
Edmund Horace Fellowes took the first step in the rediscovery of Dowland's printed songs by publishing The English School of Lutenist Song Writers: Transcribed, Scored and Edited from the Original Editions (16 vols.
This is not, however, a book about the great lutenists from the final years of Elizabeth's reign--musicians like Dowland, Holborne, Cutting, and Batcheler.
Whitaker in her 1984 article `Florentine opera comes to Spain: Lope de Vega's La selva sin amor', Journal of Hispanic philology (information which was subsequently incorporated by Paul Becquart into his `Une introduction a la musique profane espagnole du XVII[sup.e] siecle', Revue belge de musicologie (1993), and expanded upon by Louise Stein in her book Songs of mortals, dialogues of the gods (1993)), which proposes rather convincingly that the music for this opera was composed by Filippo Piccinini, the resident lutenist at the Spanish court and brother of the more famous lutenist, Alessandro Piccinini.
On the other new release from Metronome Carole Cerasi plays a supporting role to soprano Julia Gooding and lutenist Christopher Wilson.
354]), the circumstances of his various publications, his appointment as lutenist at the English court in 1612, his possible doctorate, and much more, all in three pages.
Maintaining two techniques is difficult, and no lutenist wants a conductor to know that he is playing with Renaissance lute technique in Bach's St John Passion.
Lutenist Crawford Young and his early-music Ferrara Ensemble visit Birmingham University's Barber Institute tonight, bringing a vocal sound which has been described as 'luscious, almost unbelievably sensuous'.
The Utrecht Te Deum and Utrecht Jubilate, like most of Handel's sacred works, were composed for the Chapel Royal, an institution that consisted at full strength of about twenty-six gentlemen (ten of whom were priests), ten boys, two composers, two organists, a viol player, and a lutenist. As this was a service of national rejoicing, the full complement of the Chapel Royal would have been augmented, as Graydon Beeks points out, by string players from the Royal Musicians, woodwind players from the opera or theater orchestras, and trumpeters from the Royal Trumpeters ("Handel's Sacred Music," in The Cambridge Companion to Handel, 167-68).