lustre

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lustre

1. The effect of one colour appearing to be situated behind and through another. This can occur when looking in a haploscope when it is called binocular lustre. 2. Appearance of glossiness on a metallic surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
A la Chambre legislative de l'Ontario, l'eclairage est fourni par quatre lustres majestueux datant de 1893 et 10 luminaires plus petits, de style semblable, qui ont ete ajoutes en 1985 et en 1986.
A son ouverture en 1893, l'edifice est eclaire par 4 lustres, 22 lampes murales, ainsi que des fenetres exposees a l'est, au sud et a l'ouest, au-dessus des tribunes du public et de celle de la presse.
Lustres, however, were first in evidence on glass in Egypt in the 4th century.
Lustres are thin films of metals deposited on the surfaces of ware in the same way as noble metals (gold, platinum, copper) and the lustre effect is due to the interference of incident and reflected light.
Daisy became all too aware of this widespread praise, decided to use the same techniques with powder colours and commercial lustres and by 1914 her Ordinary Lustres, decorated with dragons and other creatures, appeared.
They were followed within two years by her now famous Fairyland Lustres, which began a virtual flood of designs featuring these patterns.
The glazes are rich in fluxes and salts, a precondition for the lustres to be able to happen and to bond well.
Stern is today the foremost lustre potter in Israel.
When considering application techniques, lustre can be defined in many different ways but, in general, lustre can be described as; "Glazes that have pearl, metallic and colourful appearances on their surfaces, obtained by reduction." Alan Caiger-Smith, who stated that lustre has a special place in ceramics history, defines the lustre as "metallic decorations on tiles and ceramic shapes".
In 2010, the main subject of the symposium, which was held between 16 and 27 September 2010, was LUSTRE.
During the clay paste lustre technique, if you do not have the right recipes in true temperatures, you can fail.
The friendship with Caiger-Smith piqued his interest in middle-eastern lustre traditions, much of which was based on the Romans' painting on glass.