lust

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lust

A poetic (i.e., non-medical) term for intense sexual desire for another person or, less commonly, an object.
References in periodicals archive ?
For a few weak moments he lustfully considers human Eve "divinely fair, fit love for gods" (IX; 489), but then steels himself to his task of leading her to ruin.
lustfully for the thousand dramas of the liver, sheltered muscle of the
But others gawp lustfully at it, and I'm with them here.
In Pavlovian fashion, the chef salivates at every mention of alcohol, lustfully wiping or licking his lips (CSS 573-574).
Audiences also jeered a scene in which Marian seduces the wife of an SS officer and she lustfully shouts "Jew" as they make love.
As in the Anderson home, where Willie is lustfully mesmerized by Ruth, his attention in the Tilson home is focused elsewhere, mostly on its material comforts.
He "sounds like the descendant of Wilde's Dorian Gray", in the sense that although he loves his appearance and lustfully enjoys his young body, he still loves his "wrinkled and sagging wife" (Thomas 158).
In Ligabue's film, women are either absent (Bruno's girlfriend), ignored or exploited (the girl who reluctantly accompanies Freccia and his friends on their tour around Correggio), regarded simply as sexual objects (Boris and Tito lustfully look at girls while spying on another radio), or generally criticized (the most significant example being Freccia's mother who appears from the very beginning in a negative light).
Having consulted male and female friends and colleagues, how is it that they do not find themselves lustfully lured by these window dollies?
But believing gardening was as easy as it appeared in her books, she lustfully eyed the empty, sunny acre in front of her house.
(16) Actually, the Ovidian narrative of the life-giving' artist's story is another reading of 'Pygmalion.' In an earlier one, in Philostephanus' version of the Cyprian legend, Pygmalion was a king, not an artist, who was "lustfully infatuated with a statue of the goddess Venus, which he took from the sanctuary and polluted with his embrace." (17) It is important to emphasise that Ovid changed the source story because in his version he made the King of Cyprus (or of Paphos) from "the perverse agalmatophiliac [viz.
Their desire was to make a gift of themselves to one another, lovingly, never to use one another, lustfully. As John Paul II points out, love is the opposite of use.