sequestrum

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sequestrum

 [se-kwes´trum] (L.)
1. a piece of dead bone that has become separated from sound bone during the process of necrosis.
2. any tissue that has become sequestered.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

se·ques·trum

, pl.

se·ques·tra

(sē-kwes'trŭm, -tră),
A piece of necrotic tissue, usually bone, which has become separated from the surrounding healthy tissue.
[Mod. L. use of Mediev. L. sequestrum, something laid aside, fr. L. sequestro, to lay aside, separate]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sequestrum

(sĭ-kwĕs′trəm)
n. pl. seques·tra (-trə)
A fragment of dead bone separated from healthy bone as a result of injury or disease.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sequestrum

Orthopedics A plug of necrotic bone separated from viable bone. See Button sequestrum, Kissing sequestrum.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

se·ques·trum

, pl. sequestra (sē-kwes'trŭm, -tră)
A piece of necrotic tissue, usually bone, which has become separated from the surrounding healthy tissue.
[Mod. L. use of Mediev. L. sequestrum, something laid aside, fr. L. sequestro, to lay aside, separate]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sequestrum

A piece of dead, often detached, bone lying within a cavity or abscess. Sequestra usually form as a result of long-term OSTEOMYELITIS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

se·ques·trum

, pl. sequestra (sē-kwes'trŭm, -tră)
Piece of necrotic tissue, usually bone, which has become separated from the surrounding healthy tissue.
[Mod. L. use of Mediev. L. sequestrum, something laid aside, fr. L. sequestro, to lay aside, separate]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012