lung field


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lung field

The region in the body containing a lung. Often, 'lung field' refers to the section of a medical image (e.g., chest xray) that shows a lung.
See also: field
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Doi, "Image feature analysis for computer-aided diagnosis: Detection of right and left hemidiaphragm edges and delineation of lung field in chest radiographs," Medical Physics, vol.
Lung ultrasound demonstrated bilateral lung sliding anteriorly and B-lines in bilateral inferolateral lung fields (Images 6-7, Videos 4-5).
By the improved toboggan method, the highlighted vessels, tracheal wall and other noise in the gradient image will be moved into the lower value of the lung field while the lesion remains at a higher value.
The present study confirms and complements the findings of Chiang et al., (19) stating that the proportions of patients with DM with any cavity, cavitatory lesions over upper lung field, cavitatory lesions over lower lung field, large cavity (>3 cm), and multiple cavities were all highest among patients with PGC.
As per the radiographic presentation of pulmonary lesions, patients with both upper and lower lung field lesions, i.e., extensive had severe hyponatremia (76.9%).
The cranial ventral lung field sound were also inaudible, middle and caudo-dorsal lung field were appeared somewhat quiet or towards normal.
Auscultation revealed crackles in the right lower lung field with decreased breath sounds.
This operation is terminated when the increment reaches the value of 1 HU and leakage into the lung field is detected synchronously.
The X-rays were read by two experienced radiologists, unaware of the status of the patient, grading granuloma infiltration according to a numerical score (0-4) and judging the size and extension of the infiltrates (0 normal, 1 about 25% of lung field involved, 2 up to 50%, 3 up to 75%, and 4 virtually the whole lung field involved).
The prepared skin overlying the chest wall can be freely moved 3 cm which allowed examination of the caudal aspect of the lung field. The skin was soaked with warm tap water then ultrasound gel liberally applied to the wet skin to ensure good contact.
On examination, the chest was non-tender; the left lower lung field was dull to percussion with diminished breath sounds and no rales or wheezes.
Chest radiographic signs include a unilateral hyperlucent lung field with collapse of the lung, tracheal deviation and mediastinal displacement (see Figure 4) (Ho & Gutierrez 2009).