luminous

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lu·mi·nous

(lū'mi-nŭs),
Emitting light, with or without accompanying heat.
[L. lumen, light]

lu·mi·nous

(lū'mi-nŭs)
Emitting light, with or without accompanying heat.
[L. lumen, light]

luminous

Emitting or reflecting light.

luminous

1. Emitting or reflecting light. 2. Having the capacity of stimulating the photoreceptors.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using Thomist language, Joyce's Stephen Dedalus expounded this doctrine: "Temporal or spatial, the esthetic image is first luminously apprehended as selfbounded and selfcontained upon the immeasurable background of space or time which is not it.
After the mixed bag of manic excesses on show in Talladega Nights, Kicking and Screaming and Bewitched, it's also a pleasant change to find Will Ferrell delivering a restrained, emotionally subtle and more recognisably human performance as Harold Crick, a nerdy IRS agent with no personal life worth mentioning who suddenly finds himself falling in love when he goes to audit Ana Pascal (a luminously wonderful Maggie Gyllenhaal), a bakery owner with mildly anarchistic tendencies in regard to paying her taxes.
The third Barbie(TM) adventure set in the luminously magical world of Fairytopia(TM), "Barbie(TM) Fairytopia(TM): Magic of the Rainbow(TM)" is a shimmering blend of music, dance, color and mystery.
Always based on the grid or some elastic variation thereof, her paintings might be said to follow in the footsteps of Agnes Martin's luminously meditative minimalism, with its refined interplay between the grid's blank neutrality and the understated projection of subjective feeling through the inevitable variability of repetitive handmade marks.
It does lose its footing slightly in the melodramatic last act where the film slips into Pearl Harbour/Empire of the Sun territory, but luminously lensed by Christopher Doyle it remains an elegant and elegantly acted slow burning affair, emotions trembling on nerve edges, Fiennes beautifully underplaying blindness while Richardson (acting with both her mother and aunt for the first time) delivers exquisite nuances of dignity, compassion, vulnerability and fierce resolution.
Yet, typically, just when Genzken had fully formed that vocabulary in her wooden hybrids--ranging from paeans to the utopian promises of luminously colored biomorphic abstraction and proto-utilitarian mechanomorphic devices for submarine and extraterrestrial locomotion--she abruptly canceled all continuity and abandoned the holistic splendor of her immaculate conceptions in favor of an aesthetic of rupture, rubble, and architectural fragments (at the very moment her work--included in 1982's Documenta 7--had finally become widely visible).
Beginning with the first two Preludes and Fugues from Bach's 48', luminously pedalled, Schiller continued with Mozart's desolate little A minor Rondo, unlingering and unsentimental, but with its steady left hand and free-spirited right hand looking forward to the finest style of Chopin playing.
Their halos, which are also enhanced with gold leaf overlay, radiate luminously behind their heads.
As luminously communicative as Ravel, with aural imagery evocative of so many of the references in these settings of letters and poems, Correspondances is a work whose sheer exposed beauty might unfortunately put it beyond the reach of many.
Writing in these pages two years ago, Alex Farquharson expressed amazement that Deller--whose luminously engage projects characteristically highlight the intricacy of grassroots cultures and the persistent impact of past events on present conditions--wasn't nominated for the 2002 Turner Prize after The Battle of Orgreave, 2001, his landmark reconstruction (filmed by Mike Figgis) of a violent clash between police and British coal miners during the latter's 1984-85 strike.
The luminously glamorous glow leaves skin looking naturally highlighted and stylishly fresh.
Moffatt's best works--the unforgettable twenty-five photographs that compose the series "Up in the Sky," 1997, first shown at her Dia Center for the Arts survey that year, and her earlier, breakthrough "Something More," 1989--are clear-sighted, bleak, and luminously global in conception.