luminescence

(redirected from luminescent)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to luminescent: Luminescent bacteria

luminescence

 [lu″mĭ-nes´ens]
the property of giving off light without a corresponding degree of heat.

lu·mi·nes·cence

(lū'mi-nes'ents),
Emission of light from a body as a result of a chemical reaction. See: bioluminescence.
[L. lumen, light]

luminescence

/lu·mi·nes·cence/ (loo″mĭ-nes´ens) the property of giving off light without a corresponding degree of heat.

luminescence

(lo͞o′mə-nĕs′əns)
n.
1. The emission of light that does not derive energy from the temperature of the emitting body, as in phosphorescence, fluorescence, and bioluminescence. Luminescence is caused by chemical, biochemical, or crystallographic changes, the motions of subatomic particles, or radiation-induced excitation of an atomic system.
2. The light so emitted.

luminescence

[lo̅o̅′mines′əns]
Etymology: L, lumen, light, escens, beginning
1 the emission of light by a material after excitation by some stimulus.
2 the emission of light by intensifying-screen phosphors after x-ray interaction. See also thermoluminescent dosimetry.

lu·mi·nes·cence

(lū'mi-nes'ĕns)
Emission of light from a body as a result of a chemical reaction.
[L. lumen, light]

luminescence

the production of light by living organisms that is brought about by the oxidation of the protein luciferin. The reaction requires ATP and is catalysed by LUCIFERASE. See also BIOLUMINESCENCE.

luminescence

Emission of light by certain substances resulting from the absorption of energy (e.g. from electrical fields, chemical reaction, or other light), which is not due to a rise in temperature (unlike incandescence). The emitted radiation is characteristic of the particular substance. When the light emitted is due to exposure to a source of light the process is usually called photoluminescence. When the light emitted is due to either a high-frequency discharge through a gas, or to an electric field through certain solids such as phosphor which is used in fluorescent lamps, television picture tubes, etc., it is called electroluminescence. See bioluminescence; fluorescence; incandescence; fluorescent lamp; phosphorescence.

lu·mi·nes·cence

(lū'mi-nes'ěns)
Emission of light from a body as a result of a chemical reaction.
[L. lumen, light]

luminescence,

n 1. the emission of light by a material after excitation by some stimulus.
2. the emission of light by intensifying screen phosphors after radiographic interaction.

luminescence

the property of giving off light without a corresponding degree of heat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Afterglow of the luminescent pigments increased with the number of coating layers for each wood species (Fig.
In this paper, published in Science and Technology of Advanced Materials, Hong-Tao Sun and Yoshio Sakka focus on luminescent NCs composed of Pt, molybdenum (Mo), bismuth (Bi) or more than one metal element, and compare their respective advantages and disadvantages.
For their part, the shrimp must balance the benefit of eating a food particle that happens to glow against the drawback of becoming luminescent themselves, thus making themselves more vulnerable to predators.
It's pretty unusual to find this many luminescent species, typically only two to five percent of the species we collect in the field glow," Desjardin said.
With a 10% concentration of nano-encapsulated citrus bioflavonoids, the Serum Luminescent treats age spots on the face and neckline without irritation.
Ambient Lighting: A photo luminescent LLEPM system requires ambient lighting to be effective.
The green bottlebrush has luminescent greenish-yellow flowers and new foliage whose underside is flushed with pink.
In his earlier series titled "The Sea Horizon," 1976-77, there was a real referent, the Severn River estuary, but here, the luminescent horizontal strips that gather at the center of the image do not correspond to anything real.
Existing 2-D, or single-view, in vivo luminescence imaging systems are limited in terms of spatial resolution, and the ability to quantitatively estimate the number of luminescent cells within the subject.
A computer than analyzes the pattern of luminescent genes that make up the cell's profile.
Miller says, "Porous silicon is interesting material because it is luminescent without anything attached to it.
The 2704 features a 120 x 160 pixel electro luminescent display on which pressure, temperature or other process information can be displayed.