luminescence


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

luminescence

 [lu″mĭ-nes´ens]
the property of giving off light without a corresponding degree of heat.

lu·mi·nes·cence

(lū'mi-nes'ents),
Emission of light from a body as a result of a chemical reaction. See: bioluminescence.
[L. lumen, light]

luminescence

/lu·mi·nes·cence/ (loo″mĭ-nes´ens) the property of giving off light without a corresponding degree of heat.

luminescence

(lo͞o′mə-nĕs′əns)
n.
1. The emission of light that does not derive energy from the temperature of the emitting body, as in phosphorescence, fluorescence, and bioluminescence. Luminescence is caused by chemical, biochemical, or crystallographic changes, the motions of subatomic particles, or radiation-induced excitation of an atomic system.
2. The light so emitted.

luminescence

[lo̅o̅′mines′əns]
Etymology: L, lumen, light, escens, beginning
1 the emission of light by a material after excitation by some stimulus.
2 the emission of light by intensifying-screen phosphors after x-ray interaction. See also thermoluminescent dosimetry.

lu·mi·nes·cence

(lū'mi-nes'ĕns)
Emission of light from a body as a result of a chemical reaction.
[L. lumen, light]

luminescence

the production of light by living organisms that is brought about by the oxidation of the protein luciferin. The reaction requires ATP and is catalysed by LUCIFERASE. See also BIOLUMINESCENCE.

luminescence

Emission of light by certain substances resulting from the absorption of energy (e.g. from electrical fields, chemical reaction, or other light), which is not due to a rise in temperature (unlike incandescence). The emitted radiation is characteristic of the particular substance. When the light emitted is due to exposure to a source of light the process is usually called photoluminescence. When the light emitted is due to either a high-frequency discharge through a gas, or to an electric field through certain solids such as phosphor which is used in fluorescent lamps, television picture tubes, etc., it is called electroluminescence. See bioluminescence; fluorescence; incandescence; fluorescent lamp; phosphorescence.

lu·mi·nes·cence

(lū'mi-nes'ěns)
Emission of light from a body as a result of a chemical reaction.
[L. lumen, light]

luminescence,

n 1. the emission of light by a material after excitation by some stimulus.
2. the emission of light by intensifying screen phosphors after radiographic interaction.

luminescence

the property of giving off light without a corresponding degree of heat.
References in periodicals archive ?
The luminescence of undoped samples under excitation in the UV/VUV spectral range was studied using a VUV spectrometer set-up equipped with a 150 W Hamamatsu deuterium lamp and McPherson Model 302 VUV monochromator for excitation.
Luminescence probably contributes to the coloration of several gem varieties, but its influence on visual appearance is hard to quantify (Fritsch and Rossman, 1988; Fritsch and Waychunas, 1993).
Understanding the past is the key to preparing for our future, and luminescence dating is playing an important role in that by revealing the timing and rates of climate and environmental change.
The new validation package enables users to test specifications including background noise, background spike, lower limit of detection, crosstalk, linearity, relative luminescence units (RLU), well-to-well precision, left-to-right bias, top-to-bottom bias, and kinetic noise, spike, and drift in the low and high signal ranges.
Ten degrees step can be too big but we thing that bigger problem is in luminescence changing.
The stronger light diffusion of the powder with a less size generally resulted in less intensity of luminescence, and so larger grain size is required for higher luminescence property.
Caption(s): The first collection from the venture is Luminescence.
Since neutron-induced luminescence (occurring as single uncorrelated photons) is known to be present in the coincidence data with thresholds at single photoelectron levels, thresholds are set to require an area in each pulse equivalent to at least three photoelectrons.
Donor--acceptor--pair luminescence radiation is used, which in its dependence on the pair separation distance reflects the geometrical arrangement of neighboring delta-doped layers provided both donors and acceptors are present in each sheet.
Finally, in La visione di una stella proiettata verso la sua origine (Vision of a Star Cast Toward Its Origins), 2004, a tapered bronze telescope-like form, six and a half feet long, rests on the floor; inside it, a round section of white aluminum brings to mind the luminescence of a distant star, while the energy-charged halo that fills the circular space between the aluminum and the "telescope" is made of chocolate.
Luminescence was immediately measured (time 0) with a Top-Count Microplate Scintillation and Luminescence Counter (Packard), after which plates were placed in a 37[degrees]C incubator.
Because of a combination of a new luminescence agent, polymer formulation and loading, the product can be offered in either flexible or rigid profiles.