luminescence


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luminescence

 [lu″mĭ-nes´ens]
the property of giving off light without a corresponding degree of heat.

lu·mi·nes·cence

(lū'mi-nes'ents),
Emission of light from a body as a result of a chemical reaction. See: bioluminescence.
[L. lumen, light]

luminescence

(lo͞o′mə-nĕs′əns)
n.
1. The emission of light that does not derive energy from the temperature of the emitting body, as in phosphorescence, fluorescence, and bioluminescence. Luminescence is caused by chemical, biochemical, or crystallographic changes, the motions of subatomic particles, or radiation-induced excitation of an atomic system.
2. The light so emitted.

lu·mi·nes·cence

(lū'mi-nes'ĕns)
Emission of light from a body as a result of a chemical reaction.
[L. lumen, light]

luminescence

the production of light by living organisms that is brought about by the oxidation of the protein luciferin. The reaction requires ATP and is catalysed by LUCIFERASE. See also BIOLUMINESCENCE.

luminescence

Emission of light by certain substances resulting from the absorption of energy (e.g. from electrical fields, chemical reaction, or other light), which is not due to a rise in temperature (unlike incandescence). The emitted radiation is characteristic of the particular substance. When the light emitted is due to exposure to a source of light the process is usually called photoluminescence. When the light emitted is due to either a high-frequency discharge through a gas, or to an electric field through certain solids such as phosphor which is used in fluorescent lamps, television picture tubes, etc., it is called electroluminescence. See bioluminescence; fluorescence; incandescence; fluorescent lamp; phosphorescence.

lu·mi·nes·cence

(lū'mi-nes'ěns)
Emission of light from a body as a result of a chemical reaction.
[L. lumen, light]
References in periodicals archive ?
"I'm delighted to have been entrusted with leading Sun Chemical Security and will ensure that the Luminescence philosophy of giving our customers the highest levels of innovation, security, discretion and confidentiality continues to be fundamental to our business approach," said Cooper.
Actually, some people call the VUV-excited luminescence (e.g., synchrotron experiments) scintillation, but in most cases these are not scintillations, according to this definition, since the VUV photon energy is on an order of 10-20 eV, and it can excite only one electron for most of insulator materials.
We used a homemade temperature control system for luminescence measurements presented here.
Emission luminescence spectra were recorded at an excitation wavelength of 256 nm, and the peak height of 545 nm was measured.
Luminescence is a physical property of a mineral, which reflects its crystallochemical features, formation and transformation conditions.
The work aimed to experimentally investigate the spectra of luminescence and conductivity and their dependencies on the intensity of X-ray excitation for the ZnSe single crystals at various temperatures and explain the sublinear dependencies of the LAC of the X-ray conductivity and LLC of the X-ray luminescence.
The electronic and luminescence properties of synthesized apatites are compared with regard to their phosphor composition and synthesis conditions, and the apatites are discussed as possible phosphors for pc-LED applications.
Luminescence consists of pearls and radiant gold on a mosaic of diamonds that evoke reflections cast by light.
However, for the use in real printing process, the influence of technological factors on photoluminescence properties of the obtained printed layers should be considered in order to enhance the intensity of luminescence, manage its original color, and calculate further changes in luminescence properties of smart packaging elements on a smart packaging during its exploitation in contact with food products.
Moreover, particularly in our crossed-fiber sensor platform, swelling of the cladding itself may cause changes of the luminescence signal, resulting in increased measurement errors.
Here we analyze the temperature dependent luminescence features of [Pr.sup.3+] doped La[F.sub.3] both microcrystalline powder and crystalline NPs and demonstrate the opportunity of applying them as nanothermometers for the 80-320 K temperature range, especially focusing on the physiological one (10-60[degrees]C).
From the spectra, the integrated luminescence intensity (I) was calculated by the areas in the range between 420 and 670 nm, and I per 1mol of Alq was calculated by dividing I by the adsorbed molar amount of Alq on the MPS films.