lumen

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Related to lumens: Lumens Per Watt

lumen

 [lu´men] (L.)
1. the cavity or channel within a tube or tubular organ, as a blood vessel or the intestine.
2. the SI unit of rate of flow of radiant energy, specifically that of the visible spectrum. adj., adj lu´minal.

lu·men

, pl.

lu·mi·na

,

lu·mens

(lū'men, -min-ă, -menz),
1. The space in the interior of a hollow tubular structure (for example, artery or intestine).
2. The unit of luminous flux; the luminous flux emitted in a unit solid angle of 1 steradian by a uniform point source of light having a luminous intensity of 1 candela.
3. The volume enclosed within the membranes of a mitochondrion or of the endoplasmic reticulum.
4. The bore of a catheter or hollow needle.
[L. light, window]

lumen

/lu·men/ (loo´men) pl. lu´mina   [L.]
1. the cavity or channel within a tube or tubular organ.
2. the SI unit of luminous flux; it is the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source with luminous intensity of one candela.lu´minal

residual lumen  the remains of Rathke's pouch, between the distal and intermediate parts of the pituitary gland.

lumen

(lo͞o′mən)
n. pl. lu·mens or lu·mina (-mə-nə)
1. Anatomy The inner open space or cavity of a tubular organ, as of a blood vessel or an intestine.
2. Biology The interior of a membrane-bound compartment or organelle in a cell.
3. Abbr. lmPhysics The SI unit of luminous flux, equal to the amount of light per unit time passing through a solid angle of one steradian from a light source of one candela intensity radiating equally in all directions. See Table at measurement.

lu′men·al, lu′min·al adj.

lumen

[lo̅o̅′mən] pl. lumina, lumens
Etymology: L, light
1 a tubular space or the channel within any organ or structure of the body.
2 a unit of luminous flux that equals the flux emitted in a unit solid angle by a point source of one candle intensity. lumenal, luminal, adj.

lu·men

(lm), pl. lumina (lū'mĕn, -mi-nă)
1. The space in the interior of a tubular structure, such as an artery or intestine.
2. The unit of luminous flux; the luminous flux emitted in a unit solid angle of 1 steradian by a uniform point source of light having a luminous intensity of 1 candela.
[L. light, window]

lumen

The inside of any tube, such as a blood vessel, an air passage (bronchus) or the intestine.

lumen

any cavity enclosed within a cell, or structure, such as the lumen of the gut.

Lumen

The inner cavity or canal of a tube-shaped organ, such as the bowel.
Mentioned in: Amebiasis

lumen

space within hollow tube, e.g. cross-sectional area of an artery

lumen

1. SI unit of luminous flux. It is equal to the flux emitted within a unit solid angle of one steradian by a point source with a luminous intensity of one candela. Symbol: lm. 2. The space in the interior of a tubular organ, such as an artery. See luminous flux; quantity of light; lux; SI unit.
Table L4 Approximate luminance (in cd/m2) of some objects
sun109
car headlight107
incandescent lamp (tungsten)106-107
fluorescent lamp104-105
clear sky at noon104
cloudy sky at noon103
shady street by day103-104
full moon103
book print under artificial light>102
photopic vision>10
street illumination1-10−1
mesopic vision10-10−3
cloudless night sky with full moon10−2
scotopic vision<10−3
moonless and cloudless night sky10−3-10−6

lu·men

, pl. lumina (lūmĕn, -mi-nă)
1. Space in interior of a hollow tubular structure (e.g., artery or intestine).
2. The bore of a catheter or hollow needle.
[L. light, window]

lumen (loo´mən),

n the space within a tube structure, such as a blood vessel, tube, or duct.

lumen

pl. lumina [L.]
1. the cavity or channel within a tube or tubular organ, as a blood vessel or the intestine.
2. the SI unit of light flux.
References in periodicals archive ?
Housed in an aerospace-grade aluminum tube with a stainless steel clip and bolt, the smooth "bolt" action flashlight has three modes ranging from 100 lumens down to five.
If the LED source efficacy is 100 lumens per watt, but the LED fixture efficacy is 17 lumens per watt, then the optical efficiency of the fixture is only 17 percent.
The Illuminating Engineering Society New York City Section (IESNYC) announced that the 2016 Lumen Awards are open for submissions now through February 8, 2016.
Seeing as most modern flashlights have very focused beams, lumens are a logical measurement for their manufacturers to use.
Hands-on and adding value during every step of the process, Simon Whittle, Head of Lighting and Innovation for the Titchfield Group, said, "Following an extensive review, we recommended the Digital Lumens system for its ability to deliver unmatched energy efficiency savings to our client; for its completely integrated, end-to-end approach to lighting that addressed all the needs within Ardo's mobile racking facility; and, for its superior illumination qualities.
EB-Z8350W/EB-Z8355W with 8500 lumens of white and 8500 lumens colour light output, WXGA resolution, RRP $15,499.
70 might be considered to be a ratio of mean to initial lumens.
The 3M announced two new models with up to 30 lumens brightness and a two-hour battery life at standard mode: the MPro 160, available this month, and the MPro 180, available in January 2011.
However, he adds, light losses--such as a 3 percent drop per meter of optical fiber length--generally restrict the system's useful output to about 50,000 lumens.
Lumens can start and stop, previously accomplished only by welding plugs in a secondary operation.
Wattage actually measures how much energy a light bulb uses, while lumens measure the bulb's power.
For LEDs this means lumens generated per watt of power consumed will continue to rise at a pace that far outstrips bulb technology, while manufacturing costs should fall precipitously as volumes ramp up.