lumbricide

lum·bri·cide

(lŭm'bri-sīd),
An agent that kills lumbricoid (intestinal) worms.
[L. lumbricus, worm, + caedo, to kill]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lum·bri·cide

(lŭm'bri-sīd)
An agent that kills lumbricoid (intestinal) worms.
[L. lumbricus, worm, + caedo, to kill]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lumbricide

(lŭm′brĭ-sīd) [″ + caedere, to kill]
An agent that kills lumbricoid worms (i.e., ascarides or intestinal worms).
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Materials gathered in route researches were used for comparative characteristics of lumbricide of different soil types.
In middle zones of these alases life conditions (wetting, density) are better for lumbricide. Mechanical composition of soils here is light loamy.
The greatest number of lumbricide among taiga soils is observed in humus-carbonate (56 specimen/M2) and sod-carbonate (26-43 specimen/[M.sup.2]) soils under coniferous forests and mixed forests.
Dietary intake, low content of fossils are addition unfavorable factors of lumbricide functioning.
Content of lumbricide in interflude of Lena and Amga rivers are significantly lower.
Obtained results may give view of mechanisms of dispersion and development of earthworms' fauna in northern latitudes and on the specifics of lumbricide ecology in zonal and anthropogenically disturbed soils of the North.
A preliminary investigation of the nutritive value of three terrestrial lumbricides worms for ranbow trant.