lumbrical muscles


Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to lumbrical muscles: Adductor pollicis

lumbrical muscles

The four small intrinsic muscles of the hand lying between the METACARPAL BONES and acting on tendons of another muscle, the flexor digitorum profundus, to straighten the fingers and bend the joints between the fingers and the palms. Similar muscles, with similar actions, occur in the feet and assist in walking.
References in periodicals archive ?
Superficial recording electrodes were placed over APB (at 8 cm distance from the stimulus site), second lumbrical muscle (at 10 cm distance from stimulus site), and second interosseous muscle (at 10 cm distance from stimulus site).
has mentioned 20% variations in the lumbrical muscles.
Variation in nerve supply of lumbrical muscles in the hand and foot, with some observation on the innervation of the perforating flexors.
INTRODUCTION: The lumbrical muscle is so named because it resembles the shape, size and color of an earthworm.
The rapidity and delicacy of lumbrical muscle action is similar to oribicularisocculi.
An aberrant lumbrical muscle with abnormal origin or insertion may be the principal cause for compatodactyly which is a painless flexion contracture of the proximal interphalangeal joint that is a gradually progressive condition.
To the best of our knowledge, the role of KMI in promoting focused activation of the lumbrical muscles in the hemiparetic hand has not yet been investigated.
The patients randomised to the experimental group listened to a tape recorded KMI task focusing on the activation of the lumbrical muscles of the paretic hand (appendix 2).
The aim of this study was to ascertain if KMI can facilitate activation of the hand lumbrical muscles in the post-stroke hemiparetic hand.
The results of this study suggest that KMI, alongside physical treatment, is an effective means to facilitate activation of the lumbrical muscles in the hemiparetic hand.
Facilitation of activation in lumbrical muscles, repeated 10 times.
Nevertheless, the presence of nonnegligible cocontractions in the antagonistic muscle groups - most notably the extensor digitorum and the role played in finger flexion by the interossei and lumbrical muscles (Follows, 1986; Ketchum, Thompson, Pocock, & Wallingford, 1978; Landsmeer & Long, 1965; Trombly & Cole, 1979) - is also interfering with force estimation.