lumbarization

lumbarization

 [lum″bahr-ĭ-za´shun]
nonfusion of the first and second segments of the sacrum so that there is one additional articulated vertebra, the sacrum consisting of only four segments.

lum·bar·i·za·tion

(lŭm'bar-i-zā'shŭn),
A congenital anomaly of the lumbosacral junction characterized by development of the first sacral vertebra as a lumbar vertebra, resulting in six lumbar vertebrae instead of five.

lumbarization

/lum·bar·iza·tion/ (lum″bar-ĭ-za´shun) nonfusion of the first and second segments of the sacrum so that there is one additional articulated vertebra, the sacrum consisting of only four segments.

lum·bar·i·za·tion

(lŭm'bahr-ī-zā'shŭn)
A congenital anomaly of the lumbosacral junction characterized by development of the first sacral vertebra as a lumbar vertebra resulting in six lumbar vertebrae instead of five.

lumbarization

Fusion of the side processes of the lowest lumbar vertebra to the SACRUM.

lumbarization

nonfusion of the first and second segments of the sacrum so that there is one additional articulated vertebra, the sacrum consisting of one fewer segment.

Patient discussion about lumbarization

Q. I have a low back pain that radiates to my leg when i pick up stuff. Is it a disc herniation? I am a 43 years old bank teller. During the past 5 months I've suffered from a low back pain. The pain is not very strong, but it gets much worse while doing physical activity. When i walk or lift heavy things the pain is even stronger, and it radiates to my left leg. Can it be signs for disc herniation?

A. It's possible that you have a nerve impingement from a disc herniation, but not necessarily so. What you need to know is that even if you have a herniated disc, the question is what would the recommended treatment be?
90% or more of herniated discs resolve without surgical treatment within 6 months. MRI imaging is generally only indicated if one is considering surgery; in other words, your pain and neurological status is such that surgery is clinically indicated. Then, an MRI may be helpful for the surgeon. If surgery is not indicated based on clinical/symptoms, then it probably is unwise to get an MRI. They often show abnormalities that are simply 'red herrings' and often prompt people to proceed with surgery that really is not needed. Beware!

Q. What is the best way to strengthen the low back muscles? After having a low back strain I've been told I need to work better on the lower back muscles as too much stress is on them and they're not strong enough to handle it...any suggestions?

A. i have lower back strains but that is because i run. my back muscles are stronger then abdomen muscles and that causes an imbalance. the best way is starting swimming. the best sport for the body... and a thing to do for now (not instead of swimming just for the time being until you'll develop muscles)- lay on your stomach on a bed with your head sticking out for about 10-15 minutes every now and then. this will lengthen your back muscle and prevent strains for now.

Q. I have developed a low back pain from some heavy lifting over the weekend. What tests in the doctor's office can I expect to confirm this. And what should the treatment be. I suspect a sacriliac strain.

A. More than likely you have developed some muscle strain. If the pain goes away on it's own after rest for a few days, I suspect that's all it is. If the pain persists and starts to radiate down your buttocks and leg(s), then you should see an orthopedic surgeon for more extensive tests. Good luck to you.

More discussions about lumbarization
References in periodicals archive ?
13-15) Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae are congenital spinal anomalies defined as either sacralisation of the lowest lumbar segment or lumbarization of the most superior sacral segment of the spine.
Developmental defects occurring at the lumbosacral border results in sacralization of fifth lumbar vertebra or lumbarization of first sacral vertebra [2-4] and developmental defects occurring at the sacrococcygeal border results in sacralization of first coccygeal vertebra.
Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LSTV) are congenital anomalies of the lumbosacral region which includes lumbarization and sacralization [2,9] observed for the first time by Bertolotti.
Above process reduces one pair of sacral foramina, which is of interest because there have been no published reports about complete bilateral lumbarization in Gujarati population in Western India.
The prevalence rate of lumbarization of first sacral vertebra is 3.
The specimen with lumbarization were examined and evaluated for the degree of lumbarization and recorded.
We used a two-fold subdivision of lumbarization (1) Unilateral complete lumbarization (2) Bilateral complete lumbarization of first sacral vertebra (sacrum with three pairs of sacral foramina, Figure -1 & 2).
We did not report unilateral complete lumbarization in any specimen.
The prevalence of the lumbarization of first sacral vertebra varies from 4.
Lumbarization creates a slightly more flexible and unstable spine.
11] Thus sacralization of fifth lumbar vertebra and lumbarization of first sacral vertebra are caused by the border shifts, cranial shift resulting in the sacralization of fifth lumbar vertebra and a caudal shift resulting in the lumbarization of first sacral segment.
42) found that there was an increase frequency in those with low back pain in right-sided scoliosis, sacral lumbarization, lumbar lordosis, wedge vertebra, bilateral spondylolysis of L5 and/or a diameter of less than 12 mm in the sagittal plane.