lucid

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Related to lucidly: flawlessly, bumped up

lu·cid

(lū'sid),
Clear, not obscured or confused, as in a lucid moment or lucid spoken expression.
[L. lucidus, clear]

lucid

[lo̅o̅′sid]
Etymology: L, lucidus, clear
clear, rational, and able to be understood. See also lucid interval.

lu·cid

(lū'sid)
Clear, not obscured or confused, as in a lucid moment or lucid spoken expression.
[L. lucidus, clear]

lu·cid

(lū'sid)
Clear, not obscured or confused.
[L. lucidus, clear]
References in periodicals archive ?
He also lucidly chronicles Arnold's activities outside Quebec during the month that he awaited the arrival of the rebel army under General Richard Montgomery that had invaded Canada through the Champlain corridor.
When he wakes he sits up and talks to us perfectly lucidly.
Writing a book on communication skills is beset with difficulties, not least of which is the need to write lucidly.
In Rimbaud, l'Italie, les Italiens Dotoli sets out his case lucidly, methodically, and persuasively.
Lucidly written and solidly researched, it achieves its expressed purposes and will be a useful tool for high school students and faculty for many years to come.
His lived experience with the subject allows him to write lucidly and effortlessly but not in an intimidating way.
But when I realized my thighs didn't chirp when I wore corduroy, my plan came lucidly into focus.
A set of lucidly presented drawings and essays by Peter Eisenman and Hanno Rauterberg complete a well-judged package.
Bryant argues, at times lucidly, that despite the general ambivalence of our society, and indeed, Black men themselves, the myth is alive, well and still possessed of a destructive power.
They're concerned with the usual angst, exploration, and antics of the average dispossessed, but written very lucidly and with feeling.
Through a cultural and social history of festivals, then, Curcio-Nagy lucidly charts the major political trends in Spanish colonialism, from Hapsburg to Bourbon rule on the eve of Independence.
synthesizes lucidly major aspects of Rahner's Christocentrism: his Scotistic view that God created for the sake of Incarnation, that all grace is Christ's, and that Jesus' obedient sacrificial death involved no change in God but created a new situation for humanity.